Chisels for tropical hardwoods?

Can anyone recommend reasonably priced chisels( say around $100-150 for a set of six) that are tough enough to hold up to tropical hardwoods? I have a set of Marples Blue Chip which I always thought were fairly decent chisels and a good value. Recently I was trying to make some cross grain cuts in some jatoba. The cut was a heavy paring cut and I was using a deadblow mallet to hasten it along. I was very chagrined to discover that I actually chipped the steel on the chisel. Is possible that my chisels are defective? Am I asking too much of the Marples? In either case I definitely need new chisels to cut the very obstinate jatoba. Any recommendations from users who have actually used chisels that can cut wood like this?
Paul
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you're whacking them with a mallet, a different edge angle may help. Try making the edge 5 degrees steeper (ex:// regrinding 25 to 30, or 30 to 35).
I've got the same Marples, as well as a set of Hirsch (Two Cherries) firmer chisels. The Marples are actually very good chisels for the money and quite serviceable. I keep my Blue Chips ground to 30 degrees for all around use, including trim carpentry, and the Hirsch (and a Veritas Skew set) ground to a shallower 20 or 25 degrees. I never hit the shallow grinds, using them only for fine hand work, like hand fitting machined joints and hinge installation. I have a set of mortise chisels ground to a 35 degree bevel, but rarely use them with my preferred methods.
I usually keep this book: <(Amazon.com product link shortened)> handy at the sharpening station for reference. The book is often too much information, but at least it's set up for relatively easy reference to accomplish a task. The theory sections seem to be very well respected by those who are deeply into sharpening theory. <G>
Another idea that's helped me lots with hand tools is keeping a pocket "Sharpening Notes" notebook handy at the sharpening station. This lets me remember the details of little-used tools, and what did and didn't work on all of my tools. In the book, I'll note angles, jig used, setting details for the jig, etc...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Lincoln Terns" wrote...

The Marples morticing chisels are beefier than standard chisels and might do the trick. You could also try regrinding your chisels to 35 or maybe even 40 degrees. That's really a better angle for mortising than for paring, but if the wood is that hard it could help keep the edges from chipping.
Moonstone Plovers www.tjwoodworking.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Fri, Dec 1, 2006, 3:32pm (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@cit.com (LincolnTerns) doth sayeth: <snip>The cut was a heavy paring cut and I was using a deadblow mallet to hasten it along. <snip>
You can quote me on this, but it won't mean a thing. LOL I have the feeling that using a deadblow mallet could well have had something to do with damaging the chisel. I'd think a carving mallet would have been better.
I've got an inexpensive set of Hf chisels. I've even used them on som almost rock hard pallet wood, using turned carving mallts, sometimes whacking the Hell out of them. I have to resharpen them oftener than the pricey stuff, but no signs of damage, except the more rapid dulling.
JOAT I am, therefore I think.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If the steel chips before dulling, you need a steeper angle.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CW wrote:

Doh! ( dope slap to forehead) Thanks for all of the quick responses pointing out the obvious and completely overlooked solution. I will regrind and take another whack at the wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I recommend you spend a little more and get the Lie-Nilesen chisels.
http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?catR1
Lincoln Terns wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.