Chisels broke

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Nick Huckaby asks:
I bought four sets of chisels from a used place. The kind with a light green see-thru handle and a black trim - no brand. It performed fine for a few weeks until a pearl sized chip came off in sections from the tip of the green handle which I did not notice earlier. I was chiseling against the grain of the wood, not along the grain as instructed from a book. But, I've chiseled against the grain with a 10-year old Stanley (with a non-see-thru plastic handle) without problems.
The problem is that a few of the green see-thru chisels have 10-15 percent chips gone from its plastic striking surface. Since that day I am more careful. I'm not sure whether the cause is the a 12-oz. iron hammer or the way I pound them. What's the best way to repair these tool?
First, the chisels didn't break. The handles did. Second, the chisels didn't break, you broke them.
I don't know where you got an iron hammer, but use a mallet, instead of a steel hammer. Now, you can take the handles off, turn new handles, install them and use a wooden, rawhide (my preference) or plastic mallet.
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Charlie Self"

Rawhide ? really?
I have plenty of rawhide mallets that I use for coppersmithing, but I've never heard of anyone using them to drive chisels before - always wood.
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On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 12:20:52 +0000, Andy Dingley

I have a few rawhide mallets. every once in a while one or another of them will be used to drive a chisel, like if the mallet happens to be out at the time or is the right weight for the cut or whatever. usually I do use a wood mallet, but I don't have a rule about it....
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Andy Dingley responds:
Rawhide ? really?
I have plenty of rawhide mallets that I use for coppersmithing, but I've never heard of anyone using them to drive chisels before - always wood.
Yeah, rawhide. I've got a couple with cast iron holders that are weighty enough--ye olde basic rawhide mallet is very light, but add 16 ounces of cast iron, and bingo. I've also got one that has a copper head and a rawhide head...great for non-sparking needs, but I no longer work around such substances when striking is needed, so it is also handy for driving chisels. To me, the more compact heads are easier to control than larger wood mallets, though I also like the various deadblow Stanley hammers.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

I prefer them for framing chisels.
Kevin Gallimore
-
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"Charlie Self" wrote in message

Your comment brought back memories of when you used to see a lot of rawhide tools, and rawhide _in_ tools. Rawhide was a staple of the life on the frontier and one of the handiest things to have around. It was used to write on, as seats and backs for chairs, as "windows", as shopping bags, as lariats and whips, as bridles, as glue when ground into a powder ... and, because of its ability to stretch when wet and seriously contract when dry, was used universally to fasten things together, much like nails today. The plains Indians often wrapped prisoners in a fresh buffalo hide and left them out in the sun for a few days ... constricted their options considerably. :) Stranded folks were even know to survive by chewing on it.
I have a collection of J. Frank Dobie works, a Texas historian, folklorist, and professor of English at the University of Texas in the early 1900's who wrote extensively about rawhide and its uses in some of his early pieces. Dobie was raised on a Texas cattle ranch and is well known for having interviewed old timers about such things.
Fascinating, useful material.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 11/06/04
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Nick Huckaby apparently said,on my timestamp of 6/03/2005 1:50 AM:

You can't easily repair them. Try grinding/sanding to shape? Or better yet, get another set. They are cheap enough.
The iron hammer would be the cause. Use a mallet. Wood is a good choice and you can make one yourself. Rawhide hammers are the best for this, IMHO. But hard to find. If all else fails, get one of those cheap hammers with one side rubber mallet, the other yellow nylon. Use the nylon side: it bounces really well.
It's important that the head of the hammer is wider than the top of the chisel handle. Otherwise it's real easy to swing slightly off-centre and end up with a chip.
HTH Cheers Nuno Souto in sunny Sydney, Australia snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com.au.nospam
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Nick Huckaby wrote:

hammer. ...lew...
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mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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wrote:

some cheap chisels have decent steel, some don't. if yours don't, treat them as disposable. if they do, make new wooden handles.
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And this 4-1/2" mallet: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&p0004&cat=1,41504 Or this type from anywhere else, and you'll be proper. I have some of these chisels and they are an acceptable tool steel that does take a very fine edge. When honing these Buck Bros., the edge does build up a signifigant bur, but it is easliy lapped off perfectly clean, I was happy with that, and got a glass edge from 1200 grit paper.
--
Alex
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<< Snip >>

I don't know what the best way to repair them is, but I see a few causes for your problem right offhand. First, a "plastic striking surface" is not a striking surface at all- the chisel is most likely designed for hand use only. If you can't push it by hand, it's probably not sharp enough for what you're doing. Chisels that are intended to be used with mallets usually have a steel shaft running all the way through the tool, and a metal striking plate at the end or a socket-type reciever for the handle, and (again) a metal striking plate at the end. Asking plastic to hold up to repeated hammering it probably unrealistic, unless you get some superb chisels.
Second, even when carving with a mallet, you probably want to use a wooden mallet rather than an iron hammer.
Third- Chisels carve, they don't umm.. "pound". They're not nails, after all. Try taking several shallower cuts, and sharpen your tools more often!
Sounds like you got yourself a fairly cheap set of chisels to begin with- it may just be easier to get another set than it is to fix them. Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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I bought four sets of chisels from a used place. The kind with a light green see-thru handle and a black trim - no brand. It performed fine for a few weeks until a pearl sized chip came off in sections from the tip of the green handle which I did not notice earlier. I was chiseling against the grain of the wood, not along the grain as instructed from a book. But, I've chiseled against the grain with a 10-year old Stanley (with a non-see-thru plastic handle) without problems.
The problem is that a few of the green see-thru chisels have 10-15 percent chips gone from its plastic striking surface. Since that day I am more careful. I'm not sure whether I had used a wrong hammer or whether I pound them too hard. What's the best way to repair these tool?
Thanks
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id get a rubber chair foot or something and stick it over the end.
and a wooden mallet or rubber for striking.
randy

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"Tim Zimmerman" wrote

Hi, This message was already posted, unless you don't mind replying again. There was an internal ISP error which caused a mirrored post that is beyond my control. The actual post is here. http://snipurl.com/daib
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On Tue, 08 Mar 2005 02:49:41 GMT, the inscrutable "Tim Zimmerman"

I'm with xrongor. Crutch tip 'em, use a wooden mallet, but I'll add one more extremely important thing:
Give them to SWMBO and buy a REAL set for yourself.
========================================================= I drank WHAT? + http://www.diversify.com --Socrates + Web Application Programming
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Tim Zimmerman"

Either just ignore it, or saw the end of the handle a little shorter, but giving you a flat surface.
Then get a wooden mallet for driving chisels.
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