chisel grinding angle

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What is the best angle to grind chisels? I use them to clean up work, pare of slight amounts, clean mortises, etc....And after I grind, what angle to I hone? Thanks. Robert
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good god man you don't "Grind" a chisel ! ooooooh the humanity. Where did you start ? You have excelled to making "Mortises" etc.... and you don't know how to shapen a chisel? Me thinks you are trolling and need to change your bait

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It is common to "grind" chisels. When honing no longer produces an acceptable edge grinding is called for. I use a Baldor slow speed grinder with a 120 grit wheel...usually at a 25 degree angle. After putting a hollow grind on the tip, I then hone at the angle produced by the tip and the heel. The advantage of grinding in this manner is that you don't need to hone the entire bevel....just the tip and heel. Therefore, honing goes much faster. Over time, the hollow grind will be removed by honing. When you no longer have that hollow grind...regrind the chisel.
Bill

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Not that I disagree but I've never taken a chisel to a grinding wheel never.Every one of mine are hand rubbed with a flat bastard and then stroped across a whet stone and fine emery cloth or water paper producing excellent results.

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On Thu, 01 Jan 2004 19:39:36 -0330, Dan Parrell wrote:

Many folks around these parts subscribe to this method:
http://www.shavings.net/SCARY.HTM
-Doug
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I would be afraid of the grind stone for two reasons first been,if you take metal away,there's no putting it back and second if the grinding wheel is used for other purposes and isn't dressed properly ie' small nicks and uneveness it could cause other complications and as well may heat up and change the hardness composition or temper of the edge which would fail. This would lead me back to hand dressing the chisel.There's an interesting article in januarys popular woodworking magazine by Nick Engler called Very Scary Sharp. He's designed a honing guide complete with plans, it's a worth while venture for precision sharpening For me It's a labour of love. It's the way I was educated.

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On Thu, 01 Jan 2004 21:57:02 -0330, Dan Parrell wrote:

That's the link I gave you - the original Scary Sharp (TM) referred to in Nick's article.
-DOug
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I have the issue in front of me, get it doug it's certainly worth seeing, the link don't show the plans or the photos

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On Thu, 01 Jan 2004 22:22:30 -0330, Dan Parrell wrote:

I understand and I have the article. I was pointing out that the link I gave is the same one as is referrenced in Nick's article. Nick's honing jig is a value add to scary sharp as well as his mention of the alternatives to glass.
-Doug
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It doesn't matter what tool you use, when you are shaping the bevel, you are grinding. Grinding is merely the action of removing material through friction. Me, I use a Tormek water wheel and leather wheel. I flatten the backs on waterstones, but I find the Tormek much faster and more accurate than the waterstones for doing the bevels.
OBTW, honing and polishing are also grinding. Just much finer forms.
Cheers, Eric
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[...]

Not at all. Grinding is removing material in (small) chips with "geometrically undefined tools", since the edges of the grinding particles have an arbitrary orientation.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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writes:

Uh. OK. I got my definition from a dictionary (several, in fact). AFAIK, wet stones, oil stones, leather strops and wheels with honing compound, grinding wheels, sandpaper and any other sharpening media mentioned here all have particles with arbitrary orientation. Even the file, while not truly arbitrary, is not so precise that it could not be considered arbirary in use. Beyond that, your definition is merely a refinement of the dictionary definition.
Cheers, Eric.
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On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 05:56:20 GMT, "Eric Lund"

Bad move. Dictionaries are handy for spellings and The Only Real Dictionary is useful for historical etymology, but even the Oxford falls apart when it comes to definitions of technical terms.
And Webster's isn't even a dictionary, it's a political tract for spelling reform.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Please elucidate. ARM
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wrote:

American spelling often varies from UK English. Many of these are traceable back to Webster compiling his dictionary and deliberately choosing what he regarded as the "simplest" spelling.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

Troo enuf, but its not as bad as it kood hav bin.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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ICBW but I was under the impression that much of the spelling differences
between Us English and British English occurred after the 1780s. And it was the British that changed their spelling. i.e. "color" is the origional spelling of the word
ARM
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So. Those people in the UK talk funny. :)

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wrote:

And still, there's nothing in the extended definition that can't get back to the basic dictionary definition, of which Webster's was not among those selected. Furthermore, I believe the basic contention I replied to was that you do not grind a chisel. I would contend that using a wet stone is as much grinding as using a motor mounted "grinding" stone.
The two definitions were:
1. "Grinding is merely the action of removing material through friction."
2. "Not at all. Grinding is removing material in (small) chips with "geometrically undefined tools", since the edges of the grinding particles have an arbitrary orientation."
I include the not at all, because I dispute that point. I would agree with more specifically, but I certainly do not agree with not at all. Both definitions begin essentially the same. Small chips is only slightly more specific, and, by the reasonable man legal precept, be implied in the original definition. Now, I know we use the reasonable man thing here in the backwoods of the colonies. Since most American states base their law on British law, I presume that you might have some familiarity with that concept. The geometrically undefined tools is another way of saying that no specific tool is defined here for the purpose, and so says exactly NOTHING. The edges of the grinding particles having an arbitrary orientation indicates clearly that on some scale, friction will apply, since the particles will clearly not apply a refined shearing force. I'm not sure I'm making that final point as generally as I should, but I think you get the idea.
Since we are talking about woodworking tool, I would contend that the simpler definition is certainly adequate.
Cheers, Eric
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: The edges of the grinding particles having an arbitrary orientation : indicates clearly that on some scale, friction will apply, since the : particles will clearly not apply a refined shearing force.
I have an old Scientific American article saying that there are two kinds of action.
Some particles are so shaped that they act as cutting tools and form shavings (of a kind).
Others have a ploughing action.
Jeff G
-- Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK Email address is username@ISP username is amgron ISP is clara.co.uk Website www.amgron.clara.net
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