Chinese Oak plywood at Home Despot???

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It's about 40 bucks US a sheet for 3/4". Has anybody used any of this? It doesn't appear to be oak core. I'm a bit fearful of it because I used some Chinese plywood (not oak, not sure what it was) on a job last year and when the finish (latex paint) went on the veneer got quite a few bubbles in it (i.e. came delaminated in places) I'll probably go ahead and pay the higher price for the stuff I know is good just wondered what you'all think.
Kevin
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I do not know of any Oak plywood that has an Oak core but I have used this plywood and other than the grain pattern not being great I had no problems with it. FWIW I have had expensive plywood delaminate before also or should I say that it was not laminated properly to start with as it separated as soon as I cut it.
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Over the years the same thing has happened to me a few times. That kinda thing should be caught by QA/QC... but it doesn't always happen. The distributor would always replace it and add a nice discount on the next order.
I haven't seen the Chinese plywood yet, but I wonder if they're going to be held by the same codes/standards as the North American manufacturers. What are they allowed to use in their adhesives?
I just can't get my head around the whole idea of plywood being shipped from China and retailing for same/less money than our stuff.
That's just nuts.
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"Robatoy" wrote in message

I could be wrong, but I suspect that we've been buying Chinese/Pacific Rim plywood for a lot longer than most realize. And I'm willing to bet that the source of the higher price sheet goods at the "wood boutiques" would make you even more nuts.
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I think you're right. I know for a fact that local cabinet shops use the stuff by the pallet. Around here, it is about $12 a sheet cheaper than run of the mill birch/soft maple plywood. I've used some, and it's pretty decent. Built a wood rack out of it earlier in the year. The only thing wrong was the planning--the rack is too small.
I'm another who has difficulty with the pricing and shipping. From what I understand (and I may not understand all that well), we sell them the logs, which are then shipping to China. They process it and return the plywood and come in about 40% under plywood produced only 3000 miles away--or 500.
It makes no sense to me, but my guess is we're looking at some kind of government support of that industry so it can get a foothold worldwide.
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On Wed, 14 Dec 2005 09:51:48 GMT, "Charles Self"

That and several other factors. The Chinese are artificially keeping the exchange rate of the Yuan (think that's how it's spelled) fixed relative to the dollar at a value advantageous to them. That kind of artificial control only works for a certain amount of time before the control can no longer be maintained. Since the Chinese government is a totalitarian entitity, the idea that artificial controls won't work is foreign to them and will most likely cause them problems further down the road. The other factor is the labor rate, if you can get a Chinese worker to work a whole day for less than what a first-world worker gets for one hour's worth of work, and if you have relatively the same level of productivity, you can make up a lot of shipping costs. That's even more true if the Chinese worker receives no benefits (apparently some of the more rural areas of China no longer receive government-sponsored health care). It does seem difficult to believe that one can make up two-way shipping (raw material over + finished product back) with just labor savings alone however.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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Actually, the yuan is tied to a basket of currencies, of which the dollar is only one.

And they realized it, which is why they went with the basket.

Of course, everything is relative. Cost of living is considerably lower.
Just look at the wage differential between, say, San Francisco and Des Moines; looks large, but when cost of living is factored in, the differential almost fades away.....

I think you'd be suprised at how small the shipping cost actually is.

Note that only the surface veneers come from lumber shipped from the US. Intermediate veneers are from native timbers. Leastwise, this was true for the $60 sheets of 3/4 A1 cherry ply I recently purchased.
scott
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"From what I understand (and I may not understand all that well), we sell them the logs, which are then shipping to China. They process it and return the plywood and come in about 40% under plywood produced only 3000 miles away--or 500."
I used to watch HUGE Chinese Japanese and Russian freighters dock at Morehead City NC that were essentially floating production plants. The largest building structure near the docks supplies either wood (sawdust or chips usually) or phosphorus (nearby mine) to these huge freighters. I was told that they go offshore into international waters (11 miles out if I remember) and process MDF or whatever, dump the chemicals in the ocean, then return to sell the goods.
Neat, H
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hylourgos wrote:

I believe the Japanese were processing our lumber aboard ship just outside the international limit before selling it back to us. Perhaps the Chinese are doing the same thing
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wrote:

Recently my wife sent me to the grocery store with a wad of coupons. One was for some brand name canned (in a jar actually) peaches. So I grab a jar and while I'm trying to figure out whether the dollar off on the high-priced jar is a better deal that the cheaper house brand can, I happen to look at the label and see, "A product of Thailand." I put it back.
And I thought that the main cash crop in Thailand was opium.
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Actually, I believe it is prawns. They also produce a large fraction of the canned mandarins. Not to mention some tasty combinations of spices and unusual sauces; pad thai gee anyone?
Per the CIA world factbook, they are considered a minor producer of opium.
The bulk of the worlds opium is produced from poppies grown in Afghanistan (> 70% by some estimates).
scott
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Robatoy wrote:
<< haven't seen the Chinese plywood yet, but I wonder if they're going to be held by the same codes/standards as the North American manufacturers. <<
Probably not. If they haven't joined the plywood association and some of the other associations dominated by all the "XXX Pacific" conglomerate (you know, Georgia Pacific, Lousiana Pacific, etc.) then they probably will stick to making hardwood siding for craft work that doesn't need certification.
I have used plywood bought at HD last year that was some kind of paint grade hard wood faced 3/4" that I should have bought a few extra sheets of for future use. Close grain, had a legitimate "A" side, and finshed very well. NO voids in the plies! It was marked on the edges as "Product of Chile". I have no idea what kind of wood it was, but the cabinets (including tops from this stuff) are in a busy office and they look as good as when I turned them over.
We get "baltic birch", "Russian birch" and a couple of other "birches" here at our local Austin Hardwoods from time to time, and none of them are certified to meet any standards. They simply tell me, "if you have any problems, bring it back".
If you are thinking it is hard to think of Chinese plywood selling for less than US or Canadian, then wrap the old brain around this.
I was there several months ago at our AH store getting some 1X2 stile/rail/fascia and I noticed some of the prettiest red oak I had ever seen. Simply beautiful. All the pieces were S2S, and they were a uniform 11" in width, and about 10"+ in length. No knots, no occlusions, no staining, nothing. Just nice, straight grained pink wood.
Wow!! I asked the manager how he happened on to that stuff. Just got it today, and most of it is sold, he answered. "Are you going to start carrying it?" I asked.
Don't know, he says. We got two containers of it for all the stores, and most of it has gone out to the stores or has been drop shipped. We aren't sure when we will get more as the guys at corporate aren't really happy with the reliability of their supplier.
Their supplier, you ask? CHINA. I saw the wrappers on the lifts still on the truck, saw the spray painted shipping info and Chinese characters they were pulling off the truck. Here's the great part... they sell it as "Appalachian Oak".
It is not intended to fool anyone by thinking it was any kind of oak from the Appalachian area, it is just "called" Appalachian oak since they really didn't feel comfortable calling it red, white, black, water, Spanish, live, or any other kind of oak. And it reminded them of some of the old days in the lumber biz when they actually got wood that looked like that on occasion. Hell, they don't even know what kind of oak it it really is.
So the Chinese cut it, mill it, only pack the best, ship it here, distribute it from a sea port, and provide a product that can be distributed and sold for a profit for less than it can be had on this continent. Scarrrryyy.
Robert
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"Kevin L. Bowling" wrote in message

YMMV, but all said and done, the HD close to me has decent plywood on occasion ... I've paid more elsewhere for not a whole lot better quality, but it can be hit or miss.
I agree with Leon ... I've used quite a bit of this stuff in the last few years, particularly for backs and sides that don't show, and have had very few problems.
There may be voids in some shipments, and you often find a lack of consistency in both thickness and weight from load to load, so you might want to try to get all you need from the same stack/store when you do find a good shipment.
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Swingman,
Totally off the subject. I know you have a PM jointer, is it a 6 or 8" er? And how long of a board can you plane flat and/or straighten decently?
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Leon,
I know you asked Swingman but for what it's worth, I have the 6" Jet w/enclosed base and I have done up to 7' long pieces that I used to make a table top from. Key to success is consistent pressure and speed and "getting into it". Once you start, you'll get a feel of how you're doing. If it feels awkward - then you're probably doing something wrong. It should feel comfortable and you should be able to push the stock thru the blades in a nice - fluid like motion.
Yes, you need to practice first to get the feel so take an old 2x4 and use that. When you feel comfortable doing it - then move on to the good stuff. I'm only 5'4" and if I can hold 5-1/2" wide piece of Ash, 5/4 thick and 7' long down on the infeed and outfeed tables - just about anyone should be able to with practice. I tried using roller stands and they caused more problems than I was willing to deal with. Hold the board firmly down on the infeed side just in front of the knives and feed the stock thru. Hand over hand until about 12" has passed over the knives. Now move the left hand (w/protector) to the outfeed table side and keep the movement going. The right hand keeps light but firm pressure on the stock with the left hand supplying 90% of downward pressure and the right hand supplying the horizontal push. Once the right hand passes over the blades (remember it has only 10% of the downward pressure) and is over the outfeed side - apply pressure. Keep both hands on the outfeed side with sufficient pressure to hold the board flat to the outfeed table going hand-over-hand. You'll soon "get into it" - trust me. Turn on some country and enjoy the day. Harder to describe than actually do it but with practice, you'll see if your pressure and speed is right by the surface you get.
Be sure everything is aligned and blades are sharp. I have done pieces longer than 8' but they were stock for moldings so no great weight and no need for perfection since they were going thru the router anyway. The weight of the stock will determine how difficult it will be to do a long piece.
This may help http://woodmagazine.com/wood/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/wood/story/data/375.xml&catref=wd21 but it's not the link I was looking for which had an animation on how to feed stock thru a jointer.
Bob S.

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"Leon" wrote in message

6" ... you're certainly welcome to use it if the need arises.
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Thank you Sir but I too have a 6"er.... jointer that is. I know you have longer in feed and was wondering how long of a board you can comfortable or successfully flatten or straighten.
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"Leon" wrote in message

Sorry I neglected your question. I rarely go over 4', but, in recollection, have done 75" +/- successfully with the PM 54a (the trestle table in the kitchen comes to mind, which is 72" after trimming the ends).
Can't recall even trying anything longer.
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try it on a smaller machine, and it is better done with an auxiliary tall fence on the DJ20 to help with door width, and once the door starts, you've got pretty fair balance, but have to pay a LOT of attention.
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Thanks for adding to the comments Charles. I was considering the DJ20 but since you have indicated that it may be a bit of a stretch to go 8'+ on boards I think I will put that purchase on hold for a while. Have you seen the posts regarding the FWW article on the sled to flatten boards with a planer? And/or have you done this yourself? I am looking at upgrading to a Delta 22-780 planer.
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