Cherry Finishing - again

Before you ask, I did a Google search but didn't find exactly what I was looking for. I just finished (nearly) a nice Arts & Craft Cherry coffee table and there are some noticeable blotches on the top. They are not severe and will probably fade into the background as time goes by but I was wondering if I should have done something different.
It was finished with several applications of Tried & True Danish oil followed by a few coats of T&T Varnish Oil. The blotchiness appeared after the Danish oil was applied. So now my question - Is it acceptable to use a wash coat of dewaxed Blonde shellac under the Oil or would that detract from final appearance? I have tried it on a couple of pieces of scrap but thought I would solicit some opinions from the more experiences finishers. Since I have three more tables to make for the house, I would like to do a better job on the rest of them.
Staining is NOT an option but I would appreciate any help this wise group can supply.
A long time lurker - Ron
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Yes, using a blonde shellac is quite acceptable. I'd use a 1# cut to seal it first, and that should reduce the blotching without detracting from the final appearance.
Brian.

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When do you want to use the shellac? Before the Danish or before the Varnish? I've used the shellac after danish oil, with success. Also used it after T&T original polymerized linseed oil, with a long curing time.
I haven't tried danish oil over a shellac wash coat. It hadn't occured to me. I have some cherry in the rack that seems to have a more open grain to it, where that might work well. It almost seems as though it was steamed in the drying process...
Patriarch
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I have been able to eliminate or at least reduce blotching on cherry by using 320 grit or finer with a ROS. Then I use a Bahco 6" cabinet scraper. The surface should look polished with this method when done. Scrible using a soft pencil on it's side befor scraping to see what areas have been done if you want. (Try a small area first.) Run the scraper with the grain and "downhill", similar to how you would run wood thru a planer. I also use a scraper on poly between coats but not afer the last coat. I hold the scraper about 30 degrees from vertical and about 30 to 45 degrees to the grain. I pull the scraper and keep it bent slightly so the corners don't dig in. Staining also is more even on a scraped surface.

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ranted:

Blotches in sheen or color?

It sounds as if your blotch is sheen-related. The varnish in the varnish oil started to give you a build coat when you stopped applying it. Give it a few more coats and see if it evens out.
As to shellac, I'd have used it after a coat or two of the danish oil after it had cured for a week (- month) or so if I was going to use it.

1 Atta Boy coming your way, Ron. <clap clap clap>
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