Cherry burns on rips

I am doing some long rips on cherry with a new Freud Diablo (or something like that) 24T blade. If I shove the wood through as fast as I can, I get a nice clean cut. But, if I hesitate for even a split second just to change how my hand is on the wood, it leaves a burn.
It hasn't done this on walnut, oak, ash, maple, etc.
Am I doing something wrong (or is my saw doing something wrong), or is cherry just that sensitive and all is normal? Thanks.
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I have noticed the same thing myself with cherry. I don't know why, but it does seem to happen.
I will be watching for the answer.
-- Al Reid
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." --- Mark Twain

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Cherry is sensitive to burning so you do have to use the right technique to keep it moving. Also having you TS properly tuned and having a CLEAN sharp blade helps.

on
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Also, your wood needs to be straight.
--
Rumpty

Radial Arm Saw Forum: http://forums.delphiforums.com/woodbutcher/start
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Huh? Do you mean one edge needs to be straight? i.e. the side that rides against the rip fence must be straight? I am assuming this is what you mean. Include a little more info in your posts OK? Because sometimes, cherry wood can be uneven and still be ripped successfully without burning. A well-tuned saw, clean and sharp blade and attention paid to the feedrate will work wonders.
Just my .02 worth...
Philski
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Ok, I've been taken down a notch, I should have said flat....
--
Rumpty

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Actually, you could have said either. What you don't want is any heat-producing friction against the wood. Wood which is not straight, wood which is not flat, wood with reversals in grain or case-hardening which pinches into the blade, etc. will all result in burns. As will a whole bunch other things.
Same as with any other pitchy wood. Ever notice what happens with pine?

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There is an article about exactly this in the current fine woodworking magazine. Pretty much unavoidable from what I read. Good Luck, Kevin

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Yobosaeyo writes:

Whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat! A sharp blade, a steady fairly quick feed, and there should be few if any problems. Use a dull or otherwise screwed up blade, or stop and start or verys low feed, and problems then are inevitable.
Wonder what I did with that issue.
Charlie Self "There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured with what is right in America." William J. Clinton
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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That's the nature of cherry. I cut cherry sawtooth standards for a couple bookshelfs I made several years ago. The most time consuming part of the project was sanding out the burn marks.
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Have you tried a cabinet scraper yet to remove the burn marks? That goes way faster for me than sand paper.
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Some wood, and at the top of the list is cherry, is notorious for burning so, though unwanted, it is normal if you feed too slow or hesitate.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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would waxing the blade help at all?
randy

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I haven't cut a lot of cherry on the TS but I have cut quite a bit on the scroll saw. I got a lot of burning at first, I switched to a courser blade and that helped some. Then I slowed the saw down and that eliminated the burning. My scroll saw is a single speed so I had to rig an auxillary motor through some step-down sheves (not an easy solution).
From that experience, my suggestions would be: 1. Raise the blade higher than normal to help with the blade cooling. 2. Switch to a courser blade. 3. Reduce the blade speed. 4. Cut the wood large on the first pass and on the second pass, remove less than 1 kerf width.
5. Cut it with a handsaw (I aint never burned any wood with a handsaw).
Somewhere in there you ought to find a solution.

on
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Read the article re cherry in this month's Fine Woodworking. Cherry burns.
Bruce C. wrote:

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