Cheese Boards


Cheese boards are good projects for both the beginner and the skilled WW, and they make nice gifts.
- No complicated joinery.
- Only need table saw, router, plane or planer. Grrripper or equivalent highly recommended for cutting small pieces.
- Plenty of glue-up experience. I use TB III. For oily woods, roughen the to-be-glued surfaces with sandpaper, wipe with acetone, glue up.
- A *great* way to use your scrap.
- Little disappointment if you screw up.
- Rockler sells soft rubber-like bumpers for the bottom so the board doesn't scratch the table or vice-versa: http://tinyurl.com/7rkev . drill a 3/8" hole and press 'em in.
- Finishing is easy.
I finish them with a quick rub with mineral oil, then wipe the excess off as thorougly as possible, then top them off with 2-3 coats of Johnson's wax. (If you don't start with oil the wax will fill the pores with a very noticible yellowish deposit.)
I have since brewed up my own finish with 2 parts carnauba wax flakes, one part purified beeswax and 4-5 parts mineral oil. Makes a nice paste.
Check out the cheese boards I made for family members for Christmas: http://homepage.mac.com/heuring/Workshop/PhotoAlbum20.html
--
Vince Heuring. To email, remove the Vince.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nice work, Vince. Really unusual looking, but great colors, too.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Food for thought. Thanks for the idea for next year. I like your mix & match approach.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.