Checks in teak patio furniture

Last weekend, I took out the teak patio furniture and noticed that a number of the checks are getting very big especially at the top of the legs/backs. So I started wondering if there was anything I could do to stop this deterioration. My initial idea is to mist the cracks and then drip in some superglue (something like Titebond Instant Bond Wood Adhesive) to fill them. Any thoughts?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Glue, clamp, and a screw going perpendicular through the crack to pull/hold it together.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I tried to clamp some of the larger checks but there is no movement there at all..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Checks are not structurally significant unless they get large and lead to splitting. I may have different ideas about what constitutes a "very big" check. A picture would be helpful.
One thing I do with exterior wood furniture is to use Git Rot epoxy to coat the end grain. It's a very thin epoxy that is sucked up by the wood. You can use a syringe to inject some into the checks. It is not meant for gap filling, but it will seal the wood so it won't absorb/lose moisture at a greater rate through the end grain. It will run everywhere, so be sure to use tape to mask off the other areas, and to prop the piece in a suitable orientation. If you want to thicken the epoxy to fill those checks, use some sawdust from sanding the piece. When you're done you'll want to sand the entire piece. Teak likes teak oil. Plan on applying some periodically to the entire piece to prevent further checking. Depending on the condition of the teak, you may want to use a brightener before starting your work.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll check out Git Rot. As for teak oil, doesn't it become an annual job to do if you start to do it? And also loose the weathered appearance (silver grey) of weathered teak?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Jimbo" wrote: ==================================I'll check out Git Rot. As for teak oil, doesn't it become an annual job to do if you start to do it? And also loose the weathered appearance (silver grey) of weathered teak? ==================================== Git Rot is a very expensive way of getting epoxy that is diluted with about 5% denatured alcohol.
Do you want to end up with weathered (silver gray) teak?
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's also the easiest, it gives the OP a starting point in his research, he can read the manufacturer's product information, etc. In other words, it saves _me_ time! ;)
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Git Rot and the Titebond products both appear to be equally expensive at around $5 or $6 per oz. The Titebond CA seems to provide an advantage in that its available in a range of viscosities. One of the specific applications mentioned is hairline cracks.
And yes, I'd like to keep the weathered look.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Jimbo" wrote: ====================================The Git Rot and the Titebond products both appear to be equally expensive at around $5 or $6 per oz. The Titebond CA seems to provide an advantage in that its available in a range of viscosities. One of the specific applications mentioned is hairline cracks.
And yes, I'd like to keep the weathered look. ====================================Buy a gallon kit of laminating epoxy (WEST, System3, etc) for about $60 and a qt of denatured alcohol for maybe $5 and make all the diluted epoxy you want.
You realize that after you fill the cracks with epoxy, the cracks will be plainly visible.
A little tip about working with thinned epoxy.
Don't try to fill the crack all at once.
Tape the bottom of the crack shut with "Blue" tape, then pour in enough thinned epoxy to seal the bottom of the crack.
When the resin has "kicked", ccome back and finish filling the crack.
This method eliminates spills and runs and make clean-up a lot easier.
If you use this approach, go to Harbor Freight and buy a $5 box of surgical gloves and a couple of packs of plumbers acid brushes to apply the epoxy.
Also you will need some 1 OZ and 4 OZ plastic mixing cups.
Restaurant supply houses sell them in tubes of 50 or 100 for a nominal cost.
Have fun.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some added thoughts.
Clean the teak with a soft bristle brush and a bucket of salt water just like a swabbie on board a boat.
Teak decks have been cleaned that way for centuries.
Not sure why salt water works better than fresh water, but it does.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lew Hodgett wrote:

FWW has an article on exterior finishes this month. The clear winner was Epiphanes (sp?). Look at www.smithandcompany.org or www.woodrestoration.com for more info on how to get more info.     confused?     jo4hn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"jo4hn" wrote:

Epifanes gets my vote for marine finishes.
Jamestown Distributors has inventory as well as a broad selection.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Salt water kills fungus and stuff like that.
If you cut your self - it is best to soak it in salt water. Kills germs and promotes skin growth.
Martin
Lew Hodgett wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For a while...
The stuff has to be reapplied according to your aesthetic/labor sensitivities. Leave it alone and it will weather.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.