Checkered paint.

How about those guys at Benjamin Moore. The paint applies by brush, and the size of the brush determines the size of the checkers. Nano engineering at its finest. The only drawback so far is that it only comes in water base and two colours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds useful for whitewashing some of my checkered past...
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Out of phase, out of mind.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 1 Apr 2008 06:27:19 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Thanks for that...
You are bringing back some great memories.
In the 60s I attended a wonderful high school called Brooklyn Tech, and took a pattern making course.
In the tool crib there were all sorts of terrific things.
I remember the cans of checkerboard, and polka dot paint: 2" White on Black, 2" Black on White, 1" in the same colors.
Also, left and right handed wrenches.
And hanging in the corner, various lengths of "Shore Line."
Ah yes...
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOL.... right next to the can of 'Elbow Grease".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 1 Apr 2008 19:27:40 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Nope, if I recall correctly, the EG was in tubes...!
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 1 Apr 2008 19:27:40 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Hi again,
I'll tell you another piece of the culture at that wonderful school:
The pattern making teacher was a great guy named Klee.
On one occasion, he singled out the job being worked on by a student named Barditch. Mr. Klee called the other students around Barditch's bench and gently made an "example" of the work done there. He pointed out a dozen errors the kid had made.
The kid asked if he should get another piece of stock to start again, and Mr. Klee explained that we were not in a situation that would allow him to waste what amounted to about a half of a board foot of pine.
He told the kid to "Go up to 2N4 to ask Mr. Nepo for a jar of Number 5 Expanding Solution, and all the necessary equipment for its application."
Barditch headed for the stairs...
A few minutes later, he returned wheeling a cart with all sorts of stuff on it surrounding a gallon jar labeled prominently "#5" and containing what appeared to be rusty water.
Klee then called the students to Barditch's bench and asked Barditch to "suit up." The kid put on the heavy rubber apron, the neoprene gloves that went to his arm pits, and the special face mask.
The teacher then handed Barditch the special (metal handled) brush for the application of the solution to the job.
But moments later Klee shouted "No!!!" and Barditch stopped in his tracks..."
Always eager to teach, Klee then asked the breathless Barditch what he thought would happen were so much as one drop of the "Number Five" to touch the maple bench top. The kid understood immediately that the expansion of that one small area would be such that the bench would all but explode.
Klee then had Barditch alternately layer upon the bench the Nepo supplied newspaper and sheets of plastic apparently cut for this purpose.
With that protection in place, and to the obvious relief of all of the students, Barditch painted the block of wood with the solution.
Klee then handed Barditch a pair of huge tongs, and asked that the job be locked in the appropriate drawer beneath the bench...
Moments later, a tone rang in the hallway, and the students started to leave the room.
I was responsible for sweeping up the shop, and so, would often linger to chat with the teacher. As soon as no other kids were in the room, I went over and said "Hey Mr. Klee, that was great, but why didn't you tell him? The joke's over..."
Klee looked at me with a wink, and said "The joke has barely begun..."
With that, he reached into his own bench, and pulled out a huge duplicate of Barditch's job. Though perhaps five times the size, it was identical down to the missing chips, the finger smudges, and the same sloppy, greasy looking, penciled name "Barditch" that identified it.
He walked over, unlocked the drawer in Barditch's bench and reached in.
He unceremoniously tossed the original job into the trash bin, and then gently inserted its "replacement." It was sized so that it would not fit without a careful push.
The following day, we all filed in, and started our work.
But the buzz of activity was soon interrupted by a scream when young Barditch opened that drawer...
All this was about fifty years ago, and I remember it as if it happened yesterday.
It's nice to have all that come back,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've heard a bunch of those stories, but they're usually more mean- spirited practical jokes. Klee was a pip. Why did you leave that place? You wanted to go out and get a _real_ job...? Not nearly as much fun!
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

<snip> Reminds me of when I used to work in a truss shop and a right of passage for every newbee was when a piece of lumber was too short someone would send him off to look for the "board stretcher". Everyone was in on the joke and would send the kid from worker to worker looking for this miracle device.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 2 Apr 2008 09:40:50 -0500, "tom"

Hi Tom,
It may have been a geographic issue...
On the East Coast, the Expanding Solution had superceded the earlier (and somewhat less efficient) Board Stretcher.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 2 Apr 2008 07:00:11 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

Hi again,
It really was interesting:
That school had 6000 students, all boys, and it drew from all over New York City.
Run a different way, it could easily have developed a culture that was, as you commented, "mean spirited" but it did not, at least in my era.
There were occasional exceptions of course, but the vast majority of the teachers quite obviously loved the kids.
And yes, Mr. Klee was great.
I'll mention another thing about him:
Four years after I graduated, I returned as a teacher of mathematics, and one of the great joys of that experience was getting to know Mr. Klee (and other teachers) as colleagues.
After a few years, I left for other opportunities.
(Please hold on to your seat as we are about to move in a direction that could be considered, by some, to be ON topic...)
Still later, in a hobby-business sort of thing, I bought out an axe company that had been located in Oakland, Maine. They had absolutely incredible tools, and I sold them off.
Among the tools were many broadaxes, some with bits as long as 14", but unlike the other tools that I bought, the broadaxes were not ready for sale. They still needed considerable work.
At some point, as I was trying to learn something more about the metallurgy related to preparing those tools for sale, I realized that there were metallurgy teachers at Brooklyn Tech who would be happy to help me.
Carrying one of those huge axes in each hand, I walked into the familiar building, and waited for the faculty elevator.
I entered, and immediately saw my buddy Klee talking with another teacher, but oddly, he acted as if he did not know me.
Moments later, in a stage whisper, he said to the other fellow "Ignore him, he's in the Mikado."
All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cute story but if you tried that today, you'd be locked up for 25 years for bringing a weapon to school.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 3 Apr 2008 22:02:37 -0400, "Edwin Pawlowski"

Of course you are right...
I thought about that as I wrote about it.
What a world.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sherwin Williams has this with a USB port on the side of the can. You can load images into the paint so each square is a different picture. So far it is only black and white images.
x
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This reminds me of planting succotash seeds in the garden. Marc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tue, Apr 1, 2008, 6:27am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com (Robatoy) doth mumble: How about those guys at Benjamin Moore. The paint applies by brush, and the size of the brush determines the size of the checkers. Nano engineering at its finest. The only drawback so far is that it only comes in water base and two colours.
You've never heard of the Acme Paint Company? They invented that years ago.
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I do not have a problem with a woman president - except for Hillary.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
J T wrote:

Acme also made those GREAT roll-up holes!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.