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J T wrote:

powered wheelchair? Could set up all the power tools that way, tiny steam powered engines on your drill, saw, router. Cordless and they would burn the sawdust for power so they would have cordless dust collection as well. We should have never invented electricity :)
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Not a saw, but a neat powerplant plan. http://ww2.green-trust.org:8383/2000/biofuel/babington /
(Mark Hopkins) says: There is always the solar alternative as well.... Throw up a panel in the sun and you are chargin'!
Nah. If I was going to go an alternative route, it'd be steam.
I've got a drawing, in one of my books, apparently from a circa 1900 or so ad, of a steam powered crosscut saw. Nifty looking device. Been trying to find info on such for probably several years now, with no luck so far. I figure there must be "something" out there, but just using the wrong buzz-words, or dombination thereof. If anyone runs across such, please post it, or even "gasp" e-mail me. LMAO
JOAT The highway of fear is the road to defeat. - Bazooka Joe JERUSALEM RIDGE http://www.banjer.com/midi/jerridge.mid
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Fri, Jul 30, 2004, 5:26pm snipped-for-privacy@leadersbyexample.com (MarkHopkins) says: Not a saw, but a neat powerplant plan.
Nah, not a power plant, but a burner plan. And that idea was working long before the Marines got ahold of it.
Now THESE ARE a man's powerplants. http://www.carferries.com/skinner /
JOAT The highway of fear is the road to defeat. - Bazooka Joe JERUSALEM RIDGE http://www.banjer.com/midi/jerridge.mid
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in

Try a search on 'Hull Oaks'. It's a functioning steam powered sawmill here in Oregon. IIRC, the last such in the country. Quote the search and you get 34 hits. This one may be the most useful follow its links:
http://www.cr.nps.gov/habshaer/haer/projects.htm
LD

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Fri, Jul 30, 2004, 10:36pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (LobbyDosser) says: Try a search on 'Hull Oaks'. It's a functioning steam powered sawmill <snip>
Nope, not even close. That's a sawmill. Anyway, checked it out long ago.
I dug out the book with this in it. Under the picture it say, "Cloughjordan, Co, Tipperary, Eire".
Apparently the clipping appeared, in "Railway Engineering", by Haldane, 1897. Apparently it was called a "steam cross-cut sawing machine". It shows the thing in use, sawing a section of log in two.
A bit hard to describe. Apparently it was portable, as it has a steam hose running to it, and is mounted on a rectangular base. Being as it appeared in a railroad related book, I would suspect it would have been used for sawing up trees that had fallen over the tracks, useing the locootive boiler as a steam source. The far end of the thing has a screw, powered by a hand wheel, to raise and lower the blade, sorta a rack and pinion. Then comes the piston, or steam engine if you will, in a frame, which continues as a frame for the saw blade. In the drawing, it looks like about half the blade is in the frame, when it's fully retracted. Then the rest of the blade is in the open, and is nicely started cutting the log.
Looks like it would definitely be workable, and a monotube boiler would be simple enough to whip up. Looks like almost as much fun as the steam powered can crusher.
JOAT The highway of fear is the road to defeat. - Bazooka Joe JERUSALEM RIDGE http://www.banjer.com/midi/jerridge.mid
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in

Circular blade, or straight like a steam powered bow saw?

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Sat, Jul 31, 2004, 2:23am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net (LobbyDosser) queries: Circular blade, or straight like a steam powered bow saw?
No. You seem to be thinking sawmill. Like a cross-cut saw. More one-man type, then two-man, but possiblly longer than a one-man. On this, the blade travels horizontally, cutting a log on the ground. Like a cross-cut saw.
And, a bit of trivia, for those who don't know. IF you know what you're doing, one man can use a two-man crosscut saw, in the same manner as a one-man crosscut saw.
JOAT The highway of fear is the road to defeat. - Bazooka Joe JERUSALEM RIDGE http://www.banjer.com/midi/jerridge.mid
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in

AHA! A steam powered sawzall.

I'll bite

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On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 22:52:25 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

Drag saw, is the term I believe. I've seen them powered by the drive belt from an old tractor using a bell-crank type setup, so a steam variation shouldn't be difficult. All you need is a normal double-action steam cylinder with the saw blade attached to the connecting rod. Although I suspect a flywheel would need to be added to make it run better.

Not easily unless you either have a lot of set to the saw or wood with little pitch. Most 2 man saws are too thin to push back through the kerf without bending.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Sat, Jul 31, 2004, 10:42am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@bendcable.com (TimDouglass) says; Drag saw, is the term I believe. <snip>
Same general idea, but a totally different look. http://www.oldengine.org/shows/Chilton/17.htm
Not easily unless you either have a lot of set to the saw or wood with little pitch. Most 2 man saws are too thin to push back through the kerf without bending.
That's why I put it, "IF you know what you're doing". It is "not" easy, but it "is" possible.
JOAT The highway of fear is the road to defeat. - Bazooka Joe JERUSALEM RIDGE http://www.banjer.com/midi/jerridge.mid
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On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 22:52:25 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

maybe closer to:
http://www.steamengine.com.au/ic/sawmill/rosebery /
Steve My real email address is dealsgalore[A-T]earthlink.net
http://www.cheap-land.com
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On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 15:40:54 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

When I lived in California (two years ago) there was a guy that brought just such a critter to the Santa Cruz County fair every year. He set it up in the "old iron" area (antique tractors, hit-or-miss engines, etc.) and sliced off rounds from a good sized log--really attracted an audience!
The saw blade was probably 4 or 5 feet long.
You might be able to find him through a search of the SCC fair or the county web sites.
--John W. Wells
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J T wrote:

years until I bought the Makita and still have it :)
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I have the B&D corded drill my father won for free as part of a gas station grand opening, circa 1970. It's a 1/4" drill, aluminum housing (definitely not double insulated!), single speed, no reverse, with a two-finger grip.
That sucker will still spin a bit with zero wobble, after many years of abuse, and will twist right out of your hand if you're not paying attention. I don't use it for drilling because it's single speed, but it's perfect for chucking up a grinding stone to sharpen mower blades, etc.
Oh, and a tank of gas at 1970 prices was probably three bucks. And 34 years later, I'll put my $0.09 per year into the pot. :-)
Kevin
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snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote in message

Yeah, I fought it for a looooong time. I just kept happily using my $19.99 15-year-old Craftsman 3/8" corded drill. Then one day I got a wild hair and picked up a PC 12V cordless. I'm a changed man. I keep the corded drill plugged in in my shop, and I use it with the cordless rather than changing bits all the time, but the convenience of the cordless is unbeatable. I've even used an abrasive saw disc on it to cut wet PVC irrigation in the ground -- not a move I'd try with a cord :)
-Mike
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Fri, Jul 30, 2004, 8:46am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (MikeReed) says: <snip> I've even used an abrasive saw disc on it to cut wet PVCirrigation in the ground -- not a move I'd try with a cord
Depending on the size of the pipe, they've got a really nifty PVC cutter out, that works like a charm. And, no electric, OR batteries.
JOAT The highway of fear is the road to defeat. - Bazooka Joe JERUSALEM RIDGE http://www.banjer.com/midi/jerridge.mid
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wrote:

Yeah, but my 9.6 Makita from way back when only lasted about 2 years. Not the fault of the tool, they just aren't engineered to take a 12' 2x6 falling on them. For a long time I mostly used my cordless tools for remodeling work or for farm stuff. It really doesn't matter if they are good ones or cheap junk, you're going to destroy them long before they wear out.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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I have a DeWalt 12V 3/8" VSR dual range cordless drill. It and batteries are ~ 6 yrs old and they're not holding a charge long after running only about 10,000 screws. I checked around and found the following:
NEW 12V XR DeWalt batteries are $ 50.00 ea. at Lowes for a total of $ 100 for two A place called Powercell (or similar-was told about it here) will rebuild the batteries for 36.50 plus $ 5.00 shipping (each way) = $ 93.00
Lowes and HD are selling the whole kit: drill, 2 batt, charger for $ 119.00 ..geez the charger alone costs about 40-50 bucks.
Now HD is selling the Ryobi 12V kit for $ 44.95 ! Decisions, decisions
R
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I have a 12V DeWalt, and a 12V Ryobi. The Ryobi is crap, so be careful.
Kevin
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wrote:

Voltage is not the only thing that determines the power in the motor. Remember that you can but 120V AC motors from 1/60HP to at least 2 HP
Norm
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