"Cheap" paint

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I made the mistake of my life, with paint, but just once.
My wife wanted some large built in china cabinets made, so we talked about what we wanted, and settled on red oak, lightly stained and clear coated. I bought a good sized jag of oak, but then had some back issues and it sat for a couple years until I started on them.
In the meantime, she decided that stained oak was dated, so she wanted them to be painted. I told her that people don't paint oak; that was near to a high crime. Never mind that, paint it would be.
I knew it was going to be tough to paint the oak, but that was my task, and I would be up to the challenge.
I put on three cats of sanding sealer, with all of the required sanding, then sprayed on some oil paint. Crrrraaap. That will never do; too much grain pores showing through. Back to sanding, then with 4 or 5 coats of sanding sealer, with the required sanding, then with a couple coats of paint.
Still not even close. Now, I hit it with grain filler, sanding, then many coats of sanding sealer, until it was slick as a baby's butt. More paint, touch up with more filler here and there and sanding sealer, then more paint.
I have to admit, they look glassy smooth, like a hand rubbed lacquer job, but I sure had to work for it.
Never again. If you want smooth paint, no oak. I would have thrown the oak in the dumpster, or burnt it in the fireplace, rather than building painted cabinets out of it.
Live and learn. They say you learn most from your mistakes. If that is true, I figure I must be a genius, by now!
--
Jim in NC



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Poplar rules!
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Poplar rules!
Amen, brother!
I am now building a whole set for my kitchen to match the china cabinets, out of......
Poplar!
--
Jim in NC



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On Sat, 11 Sep 2010 11:01:27 -0400, "Morgans"

Do you sand it, shellac it, and sand the fuzzies off before painting? The stuff has fur, I swear.
-- Happiness comes of the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to risk life, to be needed. -- Storm Jameson
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On Sat, 11 Sep 2010 11:01:27 -0400, "Morgans"

AKA American Whitewood
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OK, what's that green stuff in Poplar?
Lew
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Patina
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wrote:

Patina
----------------------------------------- Snot.
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An experiment gone wrong. Somebody grafted some output from the Treasury's Bureau of Printing on to a sapling, to attempt to disprove the "poplar adage" that 'money doesn't grrow on trees.' Seems like the coloration 'took', but the patterns were distored beyond recognition.
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On Sep 11, 9:53pm, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Actually, the green patine is formed by a poplar tree growing next to other vegetation, like the kind that can climb walls. It makes a poplar green with ivy.
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On 9/11/10 10:48 PM, Robatoy wrote:

--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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*takes a bow* Thank you, thank you. (blames Bonomi)
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Ok - serious here :-)
Green-gray color is heart wood of the "poplar" or Yellow poplar and the scientific name helps us along - Liriodendran tulipifera Trade name - Yellow Poplar Family name Magnoliaceae
"Holy" Magnolia and "Tipping" Tulip tree, Batman. Color in the blooms Flowing tree. Tends to have colorant in the tree.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 9/11/2010 11:24 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

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On Sat, 11 Sep 2010 20:48:18 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Envy ivy, or just English ivy?
-- Not merely an absence of noise, Real Silence begins when a reasonable being withdraws from the noise in order to find peace and order in his inner sanctuary. -- Peter Minard
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Whitewood is usually SPF (spruce, pine, fir)
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wrote:

Not up here it's not. It is Aspen or poplar, generally - defitely one of the softer hardwoods - fine dense grain and no knots
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wrote:

Liriodendron tulipifera Otherwise known as "tulip poplar" - AKA "Yellow Poplar", Hickory Poplar, Saddletree, and "Canoe-wood". It is also sometimes called American basswood, but is actually neither Basswood, nor Poplar.
It is part of the Mognoliaceae family and is the tallest hardwood in North America. They are fast growing - growing 50 feet in 11 years, on average. Trees vary in height, but can grow to 200 ft, averaging between 100 and 150 ft tall, with trunks of 8 to 10 ft in diameter. Average weight is 31 lbs per cubic foot, with a gravity of 0.51.
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On Sep 11, 8:31pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Tulipwood
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On 9/11/10 8:04 PM, Robatoy wrote:

When I started seeing advertisements for Yellawood, I thought they were talking about Poplar. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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wrote:

They could have been talking about poplar, Southern yellow pine, or yellowheart, depending on ad copy/source/intelligence. YMMV
Googlinit, I found what is probably Southern yellow pine which has been treated. http://www.greatsouthernwood.com /
-- Not merely an absence of noise, Real Silence begins when a reasonable being withdraws from the noise in order to find peace and order in his inner sanctuary. -- Peter Minard
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