Cheap labor...

http://www.hudsonvalleysportsman.com/index.php/topic,16047.0.html
...wonder if they survived?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, hell, one guy is holding the ladder. Isn't that safe enough?
Used scaffolds, on Craigslist, go for around $50-$80, around here. A used set of 6" or 8" wheels go for about $150. Can't beat that kind of insurance.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/30/2015 9:38 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Ever see a cornice crew working on the third story? I close my eyes, drive off, and don't open them for a block. ;)
See this kind of stuff on construction sites all the time.
One of my favorites:
I always supply one 240v receptacle at the T-pole. Problem is equipment plugs vary in configuration.
Hell, just clip off the plug, strip the insulation back an inch or two, and stick the two hot wires straight into the hot leg holes of the receptacle ... don't need no steenking ground.
No problemo ...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*snip*
That's ok when you're floating down the river that used to be a street. I was just telling my sister that we've gotten about an inch of rain here but Houston's gotten a mile. You know the old adage. :-)
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, May 30, 2015 at 10:44:25 AM UTC-5, Swingman wrote:

I do too, and it makes me cringe. What could come of these guys possibly b e thinking of? I see extension ladders fully extended (talking about the l ightweight type) across to step ladders used as a scaffold board constantly .
For that matter, I see broken ladders being used constantly. Missing steps , pieces of 2x4 screwed across the sides to "repair" broken steps, etc.
I recently went by a friend's job to check it out before lunch, and his pai nter was working on the very top of a 32' extension ladder, fully extended while painting the inside eave of the gable. While touring the jobsite, we walked by the ladder and I couldn't help but feel my rear clinch.
One side of the ladder's last six inches was badly bent and damaged, and th e foot didn't make good contact with the ground. To fix that small detail, they put a piece of 1x4 under the foot with some other site debris under i t to get that side more balanced.



Hey...
Back in the time before time, we were >MUCH< safer than that. I was framin g full time and they put a temp pole behind every other house for misc. pow er needs. We had a big SpeedAire 220V compressor that ran all the guns on the job.
We had a box with a plug to match our compressor's, and the other end was s tripped ten gauge wire as you described. We thought we were safer because we used 10ga wire, and carefully flattened the copper ends a bit so they wo uld fit in the temp plug. How stupid was that?
I actually found out just how stupid one misty day when plugging in one hot wire leg and saw it arc, them it blew out the plug on the pole. I wasn't hurt, but felt like I lost about 10 years off my life!
Ahhhh....
to be young, dumb, and full of....
stupid.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/30/2015 11:44 AM, Swingman wrote:

Yeah. I had a spray-foam crew come in and do the ceiling in the downstairs garages before I sheetrocked everything. When they showed up I showed them where the 240V appliance-style receptacles where in the half that serves as my shop and told them that they should power up there. I even offered the use of a spare plug in case theirs weren't compatible. Two receptacles that power my larger WW equipment were all of 20' from their equipment trailer. What I found later was that they ran a 100' extension cord around the house and hot-wired it into the 200A service panel at the far end of the house. Just the hots--no ground. I wonder if my homeowner's insurance covers fried workers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/30/2015 10:44 AM, Swingman wrote:

I'll never forget the guy that was sanding the floors for Sara's house. IIRC he used Romex, bare ended, for his the extension cord to his floor sander. He did practice electrical safety though, the twisted bare ended splices were pointed in different directions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/30/2015 10:38 AM, John Grossbohlin wrote:

Ever see how chimney workers set up ladders? We had guys doing this on the building where I work
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i+5_1303514358&comments=1
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steeplejack#/media/File:Steeplejack_on_a_chimney_in_1960_arp.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.