Changing a Walker Turner saw from 220 to 120

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wrote:

240V, at least in the US, is simply two 120V lines from the opposite sides of the transformer. It would be difficult to get across the 240V accidentally.
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On Tue, 10 Nov 2009 10:21:15 -0800 (PST), sibosop

Good Luck. Let us know how it turns our. Just hope that his rates aren't "glowing" too. :)
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Nova wrote: ...

6 #10 (or 10 #12) "T" conductors are (max) ok for 1/2" conduit per Table. That's individual conductors not sheathed cable, of course.
--


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I still have the paperwork from a really old WT table saw. Not sure if it will help, but here's the diagram. http://tinypic.com/r/xpv7ev/4
R
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As one replid "Far better to run a 220V circuit for the saw instead. "
The motor should have a diagram on the ID Plate if it is a dual- voltage motor.
If you can, run some 6 or 8AWG into your shop off a 220 breaker - you'll find other uses for the 220VAC - terminate in a small breaker box and you can get a couple 110 circuits out of the deal.
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