Chairmaking for an experience Newbie

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Nicely done. My personal preference is either a very complicated design, or a simple one. I think that's a real nice design. (Looks like good work, too!)
Robert
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wrote:

Thanks
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A bandsaw is not crucial, but it is a big help. You can get by with a smaller and less expensive saw than a $1000 14" saw (which is what I have). The bandsaw makes short work of tenons and ripping materials.
Frank Klausz's video "Making Mortise and Tenon Joints" shows how to lay out the joints and I think is excellent. He shows lofting and joints for a chair. Jeff Millers book is a must have for a newbie chair maker.
I went to Homestead Heritage's School of Woodworking and took two of their chairmaking classes (all hand work).
I have completed three rocking chairs using their techniques and have started one for a daughter using tiger maple. I use both power and hand tools for my chairs.
The wood can be expensive. The last chair was of quarter sawn white oak and the wood cost over $400. The maple I bought for the current chair cost over $500, but the chairs should last for generations.
I can post pictures if you want to see them. I don't do the Maloof style chairs because it seems everyone making a chair does one.
Woodwork magazine ran a two issue article for a craftsman rocker (it is the Waco chair). You can build the chair with their article.
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My first major project was a dining room set. I had misgivings about making the chairs, especially since I preferred lots of spindles and slats versus simpler designs. I was mostly concerned about having the time and patience to crank out two arm chairs and four side chairs. I'd recommend doing what I did - make your table and buy the chairs. I bought some really nice chairs from an unfinished furniture store at a reasonable price, then finished them the same as the table. With the confidence and experience I gained from making the table, I also made a buffet (with dovetailed drawers and raised panel doors) and hutch in a much shorter time.
Buddy

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jbd in Denver wrote:

Always nice if you want to cut curves. But curves can be cut with saber/jig saws too. They can also be bent in or laminated. Moreover, chairs don't *have* to have curves.
Don't have to have slanted backs either. For example, the rear legs can be vertical extending a few inches above the seat; the back can be a separate slab or frame that is bolted to the rear legs so it can swing using the rear of the seat as a stop. You could also use leather/canvas/etc as a slingback ala director's chairs. Another way is a fixed straight back upholstered to provide a slope.
So many ways, depends on what you want.
--

dadiOH
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On 02 Oct 2007 15:34:04 GMT, jbd in Denver

If in the end you find that you need to move more quickly into a new set or you continue to be a little overwhelmed by chairmaking, and if you want to make the table and if you like Queen Ann, you might consider Adams Wood Products chair kits.
http://www.adamswoodproducts.com /
A close friend bought some Adams chair kits and they are well made, very solid, and a savings over what you can buy in the store. You also would be able to finish them the same as the table.
Not the same as making them but you do get to assemble, finish and the results will be nice.
Frank
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