chair design

anybody got a good book on chair design ? Looking for information on angles of legs, heights angles of backs etc. Must be a science to this .....
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On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 20:11:55 -0400, "Sam the Cat"

Do you have any in your home? in your neighbours' homes? Why not get out the tape and bevel?
Bill.
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wrote:

angles
Nope -- we all stand where in this neighborhood
Really -- wanting to know if there is a science. I have been looking at chairs and sometimes the back legs flair out, some times in, rarely are they true vertical -- is any angle better that another ?
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Sam the Cat said:

Well, as general guideline, I would say that splaying them inwards towards the center of the chair would be a bad idea. ;-)
Splaying them outwards increases the chairs stability - but go too far, and the joints to the seat frame would be under too much stress and break. Beyond that, I think it's an eye of the beholder thing...
FWIW,
Greg G.
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wrote:

Recent article in Woodwork Magazine (#88, Aug 2004), Peter Presnell, on an adjustable design in dining chairs. I thought the article was exceptional, even in the context of a fine magazine generally. The article gave me hope of making comfortable dining chairs that fit. One day in the future, after I practice some bent lamination. And the veneer-thickness cutting that is required.
I think I remember John Grew Sheridan writing a good article on a similar topic. And Jeff Miller wrote a good project oriented book in a Taunton- published series.
Good news: I've got all of the proper tools. Bad news: I've not learned all of the proper skills yet. Good news: I'm still breathing.
Patriarch
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On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 20:11:55 -0400, "Sam the Cat"
Galen Cranz has a very interesting book "The Chair" on seating. Mainly about how we're doing it all wrong with chairs, and should sit on almost anything else instead.
Taschen's "1000 Chairs" is well worth having, as a compendium of styles.
As to the nuts & bolts ergonomist data, these books are commonplace (any architecture bookshop) and damned expensive. I suggest the S/H section of a university bookshop, where you can pick one up rather cheaper from last year's students.
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On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 20:11:55 -0400, "Sam the Cat"

There are all kinds of dimensions. The big advantage about making a chair is customization. Here's some guidelines for the average adult...
Seat width: 17 to 18" Padding: Various Seat Angle: 5 to 8 degrees from horizontal Seat depth: 13.5 to 15" Seat Height: 15.5 to 17" Armrest Height: 8 to 10" above seat Back rest: 4 to 8" high and 6-7" above seat Angle of back rest: 20 to 25 degrees
I made a settee years ago that very few people used because it cut off leg circulation. Later, I cut off 1.5" from the legs and now it is just right for the average adult.
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wrote:

Ergonomics, Human Factors.
"The Woodworkers Guide to Furniture Design" by Garth Graves is an excellent source for furniture design in general and has a very good section on customizing furniture (including seating) for folks of all different sizes. I've got a copy of the hardbound edition, but I see it is now out in paperback. If you plan on doing a lot of your own designs, I highly recommend this book.
LD

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