Chainsaw recommendations

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I have infrequent need for a chainsaw and have a little McCullough electric that does OK. There are a couple of trees down in the back too remote for the electric and I'd like to have a gas saw to take advantage of found logs or limbs.
Since my use is infrequent, I don't want to invest too much. CL frequently has Poulans available. Here's an example: http://milwaukee.craigslist.org/tls/4346181306.html
Any thoughts?
Larry
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"Gramps' shop" wrote in message
I have infrequent need for a chainsaw and have a little McCullough electric that does OK. There are a couple of trees down in the back too remote for the electric and I'd like to have a gas saw to take advantage of found logs or limbs.
Since my use is infrequent, I don't want to invest too much. CL frequently has Poulans available. Here's an example: http://milwaukee.craigslist.org/tls/4346181306.html
Any thoughts?
Gramps, I bought a Poulan around six or seven years ago, from a local hardware store/lumberyard because I thought that they would stand behind it if it gave me trouble. Which it did, right away. I could never get it working right, and neither could they. Took me a month to get my money back from them. So as far as I'm concerned, Poulan chain saws aren't worth a damn, and neither is that hardware store/lumberyard.
I've got a medium-size Stihl now and am happy with it. The local tree guys tend to use Husqvarnas, but they say that they eat starter ropes. On the other hand, they start them a dozen times a day, and I start mine a dozen times a year.
Tom
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Tom, I have to agree with you on all counts. Except for Poulan. I'm in UK and have never heard of this make. I've used Stihl chainsaws for 35 years. My oldest one, a really useful 009, died yesterday. It has been on its last legs for some while but I will miss it nevertheless. Stihls have served me very well over the years and I look after my 4 saws. I'm somewhere in between a hobbyist and a pro. The wood burner takes some feeding and I have a fair bit of timber to attend to. Last week there were some tree surgeons working locally on a large weeping willow that had toppled following high winds and flooding. About 100ft high. Blocked a stream and a lane. Too big for me at my age and these guys came with a 130T capacity crane to assist! I got talking to one of the guys. He was using a Husqvarna with a 48" bar. He told me that he had stopped using Stihl as they, in his words, 'lost the plot some years ago when they started concentrating on saws for hobbyists'. Husqvarna have taken on the mantle and now produce excellent saws for both pro's and hobbyists. I think this a bit of a shame as Stihl led the market for years, but times change. Husqvarna now lead the field in pro saws through innovation. I don't think I'll ever need a new saw, if otherwise I will certainly look at what Husqvarna might have to offer. Good luck. Nick.
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Go to the local pawn shop, and find you an old saw with good compression, and ask them to start it up for you. I have a Poulan a bought when Huge hit in (89 I think) and I use it for mainly trimming. I guarantee I could go get it out of the shed, put fresh gas in it, and start it on the 4th or 5th pull. I don't know about the newer Poulans. As little as you sound like you use one, an old used saw sounds like what you need.
--
Jim in NC


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I agree, I have an old Poulan that I bought around 1980. It will take about 6 pulls of the cord to get it started as it hasn't run for about 8 years, but I am certain it will start, and then it will start on the first pull after that. I am going to clean it up and sharpen it when this cold snap is over, as I have a yard full of fallen tree limbs from the ice storm to get rid of.
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On 2/23/2014 2:52 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

That is because owners of Stihl and Husky don't sell them. Poulan owners are giving up or upgrading to Stihl.
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On 2/23/2014 2:19 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Sorry Ed didn't mean to send this to you. Stupid Thunderbird changed there reply to button
Exactly I wouldn't sell my Stihl for anything. Buy a Stihl and you won't have a need for any other saw. I guarantee it.
I have my father-in-laws old Stihl and it is still a pretty good saw. Of course it is over 20 years old. So we purchased a new one about 5 years ago and never looked back. I use it for firewood so it has to be a good saw and after 2 craftsman's that didn't last more than 2 years we decided we needed a good saw if we were going to cut our own firewood. So trust me buy a Stihl as there the only company that isn't owned by a congolermate like all the rest of the chainsaw companies out there. Go look at Poulan, Craftsman, Husqvarna, etc and tell me they don't look the same, that is because there all made by the same company now and they all suck.
Husqvarna was the most recent sell out to the conglomerate.
Buy a Stihl you won't be sorry.
--
All the Best
Dale Miller
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On Sun, 23 Feb 2014 22:21:41 -0600, Dale Miller

No harm done.

Sad to hear that. You can be sure everything will be cheapened up and they will ride the good reputation of the past as long as possible.
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Gramps' shop wrote:

I have two Huskys and love them for the compression relief button. Easier to pull and always start at 1-3 pulls. The reason I have two is: After 12 or 13 years I buggered up the key in the flywheel. New flywheels are about $100 so I opted to buy a new saw. Then I found a used flywheel on Ebay for $15 and bought it. So now I have a 20 incher and a 18 incher for trimming.
I have had a Poulan and a Mac. Both had lightweight chains that had to be re-tensioned every 15 minutes and both had starting problems after about a year.
--
 GW Ross 

 Some minds should be cultivated, 
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I've got a couple of Jonsereds. Reliable, sturdy, not terribly expensive.
--
³Youth ages, immaturity is outgrown, ignorance can be educated, and drunkenness
sobered, but stupid lasts forever.² -- Aristophanes
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Gramps' shop wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------------------- For your infrequent use, I'd rent one.
Unless I miss my guess, storage space is at a premium in your shop.
Lew
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On 23 Feb 2014 in rec.woodworking, Mike Marlow wrote:

Tractor Supply carries them in the US:
http://www.tractorsupply.com/content_landing-page_jonsered.html
I don't know about repair, though.
--
Joe Makowiec
http://makowiec.org/
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Not too difficult to find up here in Western Canuckistan.
--
³Youth ages, immaturity is outgrown, ignorance can be educated, and drunkenness
sobered, but stupid lasts forever.² -- Aristophanes
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On 2/23/2014 12:52 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

electric that does OK. There are a couple of trees down in the
back too remote for the electric and I'd like to have a gas saw
to take advantage of found logs or limbs.

CL frequently has Poulans available. Here's an example:
http://milwaukee.craigslist.org/tls/4346181306.html

I cut about 12 cords a year. My pardner just bought the Husky 460 with a 24" bar. I have a Husky 435 with a 16" bar. I will be getting the identical Husky, or a Stihl, (I think 391) with the 24" bar.
Point is, buy quality and cry only once. Stihl or Husky will do the work. Both are serviceable, with parts easily available.
Main things are basics: Drain gas when not in use. Keep adjusted. Learn how to sharpen with simply a file, no fancy devices, and that includes electric sharpeners. Get a stump clamp, learn how to use it, and you will be able to keep it sharp quickly.
If you want a saw that will start right up, Stihl or Husky is your ticket, and take those precautions. Nothing like going out there, adding a little fresh gas, and getting the job done, and not jacking with it every time you want to use it. My 345 came in a package deal for around $250. The $460 will be about $400, but we will be doing heavier work. We fell trees up to 18" diameter, and may cut four cords a day.
You get what you pay for. Buy a good one, and take care of it right.
Ignore all the tales of Poulans and Macs that have lasted decades. I'm sure there are some Pintos and Vegas still on the road, too. But if you want something reliable that just runs, and you don't spend a lot of time cussing at, Stihl or Husky.
Get an air gun, and clean it good after a good use so the pitch doesn't harden in the working parts. Put it away clean, and it's ready to go next time you need it. Put it away gummy, and the gum will set, or the gas will turn to varnish, and you will have fun getting it going properly next time.
Just MHO from ten years of jacking with these things.
You get what you pay for, and anything less than Stihl or Husky is junk. The cost difference between them is not that great when you are talking of a quality tool.
Steve
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I use an Echo 14" for a rough and ready all around chain saw. House demolition to light tree falling. Brush work, carving....... Lightweight, inexpensive, one hand operation. A sharp chain is is important of course....Good fuel mix a must, little grease gun for bearing..... Saw cover for chain.....keep air filter clean...... And a chain file and handy small guide.....easy to keep prepped.
On the larger jobs, I use a Husqavarna. High powered, fast, and dangerous..... Not a home owners model either....They make 2 quality types..... professional that tree fallers use. Good cutting. john
"Gramps' shop" wrote in message
I have infrequent need for a chainsaw and have a little McCullough electric that does OK. There are a couple of trees down in the back too remote for the electric and I'd like to have a gas saw to take advantage of found logs or limbs.
Since my use is infrequent, I don't want to invest too much. CL frequently has Poulans available. Here's an example: http://milwaukee.craigslist.org/tls/4346181306.html
Any thoughts?
Larry
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*snip*

*snip*
I've seen devices that are supposed to "sharpen" a chain that mount on the saw and you run the chain through it. Do they actually work? Or are they like most "sharpeners" out there that take a dull edge and gives you something that actually cuts (but not well) or reshape the edge like a hone?
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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Puckdropper wrote:

Here's what I was thinking about: http://powersharp.com/default_NoFlash.asp#
I thought there was also a version built into the saw. Looking at the website, though, it looks like one of those products that's a good idea but restricted to special products only offered by one company.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Mon, 24 Feb 2014 23:20:41 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Have an 12V electric file takes me about ten minutes to do the 18" and 14" saws, about twenty minutes with a regular file. Also remember to mark the starting tooth otherwise it takes all day.
Mark
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On 2/25/2014 12:42 PM, Markem wrote:

If you were to measure the cutting life of two chains, one sharpened with a hand file, the other sharpened with an electric, I would say that the hand file sharpened chain would last twice as long. The hand file simply removes less metal, and it reduces the tendency of ham handed operators to go crazy with them.
Do what the pros do. Carry a couple of very simple files, and know where to take off the metal. Same as any guy who knows how to sharpen knives. I've seen knives that were sharpened down to almost nothing, starting at 3/8" wide at the handle, and coming down to a toothpick on the point. Absolutely no need to remove that much metal besides inexperience and error.
Steve
Steve
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Another comment I would make is to keep spare new files on hand. It seems to me the speed of sharpening with a file used just a very few times is twice as slow as a nice new file.
--
Jim in NC


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