chain smoker & furniture residues problem

Friend is rehabbing his late mother's house, who smoked like a chimney. No, better make that a smokestack. The walls are yellow from the smoke, coats and coats of kilz (even premium) haven't been enough to hide it.
So, what do you do to clean up the nice wood furniture that resided in this sort of environment?
There's a few pieces that my friend would like to salvage if possible, but is at a loss as to how to clean them up.
Suggestions?
Thanx Renata
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Oddly, Kilz does not always cover every thing up. About 6 years ago a friend and I took on a similar job. One double master vanity sink was literally half full of cigarette ashes with burn marks all around the perimeter of the bowl. All trim was yellow from the smoke and the walls were yellow. Add to that the AC filter was completely plugged, NO air movement through the vent until we removed the filter. Add that she was an alcoholic and carpet stains that were so bad that you would swear that there was at least one fatality by gun shot. We simply hated to even walk into the house. Fortunately she had moved out and we left the windows open.
We however had no problem covering the stains on the walls and trim. No primer needed but we did use a premium oil based alkyd paint on the trim and a premium latex on the walls. We did however often have to reapply a second coat to the walls a couple of days later. 3 weeks later the house looked much better. The house did not smell better until the carpet was removed and replaced.
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solvent and a stiff paint brush in the crannies to lift the oils/tars. Then wipe down with a damp cloth and dish soap to remove the solvent and then rinse with a clean watered cloth. Alcohol on another rag to remove any soap residue (assumes the finish is not shellac).
Pete
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"So, what do you do to clean up the nice wood furniture that resided in this sort of environment?"
In answer to the above, wiping down with a clean watered cloth and soft will not do it. The smoke, at this time, is probably imbedded in the furniture's finish and pores of the wood. Time, may take care of the smell. However if it was me doing the job I would refinish the furniture. I would use the traditional scrapping and sanding method.
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snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote:

When I was 18, I bought a car from the Chimney family.
Three years later, I got rid of the car and it still stunk. <G>
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"I would use the traditional scrapping and sanding method."
However, if you're going to scrap the furniture, why bother to sand it?
; )
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You may have to pay to dispose of it?

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O

the lip (I mean hip)
Pete
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Hot water and amonia will clean the walls and probably the furniture as well. No idea what amonia will do to the finish on the furniture but SWMBO uses it every weeek on our hardwood floros with no ill effects.
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I highly recommend Murphy's Oil Soap. Had a similar issue with a secretary my wife received from her grandparents ... her father thought we'd refinished it when all we did was clean it with Murphy's. This is a reproduction built in the 1920s and it's getting to be an antique in its own right, so refinishing was certainly not in order.
HTH,
Rick
"Renata" wrote

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wrote:

Mineral spirits and lots of elbow grease, then polish it with a quality furniture wax. You could use Briwax, a mix of cleaners and wax, comes in several colors and neutral.
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Tue, Jun 26, 2007, 9:01am snipped-for-privacy@norealbox.com (Renata) doth query: <snip>There's a few pieces that my friend would like to salvage ifpossible, but is at a loss as to how to clean them up. Suggestions?
If I was him, unless they're woth som decent money, I'd immediately get rid of everyting he didn't want. Maybe thrift shop for the low value stuff, antique shop for the higher end stuff, let someoelse worry about 'em.
No answer off hand for the other pieces. I'd say pant, or wallpaper, the house, if he plans on keeping it.
JOAT If a man does his best, what else is there? - General George S. Patton
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