Cedar Flooring

Good Morning,
My cousin just asked about using cedar as a floor. I immediately scoffed at the idea but then thought about old New England pine floors. My father and I replaced the pine floor in his house. It was 200 years old when we replaced it.
So, I got to thinking, has anyone had any experience with cedar as a floor material. It has an expansion coefficient that is about 66% of oak so expanding and shrinking due to humidity should not be a problem.
Thanks for your thoughts.
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I would think it would be just too soft to wear well...

scoffed
floor
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I helped a friend of mine do one room David much against my recommendations. I got him to do just one room and try it out for a couple of months before he took the chance on doing all of them. We ended up pulling it up about 6 weeks later when his girlfriend plunged the tip of her high heel into it and damn near broke her ankle. (no comments guys!) We had installed T & G cedar on his ceiling and it was his intent to reflect one against the other. The look was great - but maybe for a roped off museum that no one would ever go into. Even an overstuffed occassional chair with him sitting in it caused one of the legs to dent it. I'd go with something else . . . like some 200 year old pine. We actually - we replaced the cedar floor with pine and it looked great. The cedar is just way too soft.
Jim

scoffed
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I think this calculation has been used before, but too lazy to google. 110 lb female, 3/8 in x 3/8 in heels = 110 lbs on .14 sq inches = 750 lbs per square inch. Actually more, but everyone understands lifting one foot to take a step, and few care to speculate on how much of the heel is actually in contact as she strides.
Anyway, it's just too damn soft, unless you've got close-grown quartersawn stuff, then it's just too soft. Things are different nowadays.

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Easy, I was talking about my daughter!
Her tuition is paid for her FINAL year, though.
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LOL! Congrats on not just the final year being paid - but that she made it that far, George. Gotta be a proud moment for a daddy!
Jim
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On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 09:29:54 -0400, "David Chamberlain"

    Sort of. I have built several decks of cedar. They have held up well. There are differences, however. The decking is thicker than flooring usually is. None of the decks had overly heavy furniture on them. On the other hand, no high heels went through them either.
    I think it could be done, but it sounds like problems to me. I woundn't do it. You would have to be careful of the cedar you bought--certainly not something from the borg. You would also be wise to do lots of research beforehand.
    Don't confuse yourself comparing cedar and pine for this. For something like this, they would be quite different.
        Good luck.
                Peter     
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