CD Rack Question

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I'm getting read to make a hanging cd rack to hold between 450-500 cd's. Anyway, I'm looking at 5 shelves, each 56" long. I was wondering if 1/2 thick oak would be good enough (the cd shelves are 6" deep and each will hold about 100) or do I need to go 3/4" thick to prevent any sagging. Each shelf will be dado'd into a 3/4" think side piece. Thanks for any help!
ac
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Too long. Even at 3/4" thick, the boards will sag under their own weight.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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A clear span of 56" will sag. Is there going to be a back? If there is a back and the shelves are tacked to it, there will be no sagging. There are other ways of adding strength too. If you add a lip using cross grain across the front or back is will greatly stiffen the shelf also.
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IF there will be a back such as 1/4" plywood to help strengthen the rack you can use screws through the plywood into the back edge of the 1/2" shelf, 3 or 4 screws along the length of the shelf, and you should be OK.
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Thanks for all the good ideas folks...gonna try to figure out which way to go. The back will be 1/2" plywood. There is enough room between the shelves to add a thin cleat there to support the shelves and/or also screw them directly to the back.
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If you add a divider down the center of the unit it will not only be stronger but will look much better, you'll need a back as well, 1/2" is a little over-kill for a back
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Good suggestion.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

A great tool/resource is the 'Sagulator'. DAGS, or try here:
http://www.woodworkersweb.com/sagulator.htm
-John in NH
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com Wrote: > I'm getting read to make a hanging cd rack to hold between 450-500

The weight of CDs/DVDs adds up quick. My CD shelves are supported only on the ends, 5/8-in thick, 8-in deep, with a 1/2-in thick (by 7-in deep) vertical support every 24-inches. No sagging.
--
joe2


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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Instead of spending your money on this, why not convert all your discs into MP3, then get a media server to serve them up through your stereo? You'd save space because you could put your original CDs in boxes and away, and you could have nearly endless music as your fingertips!
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"Larry Bud" wrote in message

Agreed. I relegated my CD collection to boxes on a shelf in the office closet right after iTunes came out.
iTunes on the two computers hooked up to stereo systems in the house, and an iPod, which also plugs into the dash of my truck, are about the only way I listen to music anymore. In the shop I've got a pair of Klipsch mp3 speakers that my iPod plugs into ... at a third the cost of that pricey BOSE system, and with a lot more bottom end.
And with "playlists", you don't need no stinkin' DJ running at the mouth.
Even listen to Spanish lessons over the iPod when I walk each morning ... 30 minutes a day put to good, dual purpose ... it's great to be alive, kicking, and _wired_ in the 21st century (so far). ;)
--
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Swing,
What are you using to connect your ipod in your truck?
I need a hardwired solution for mine, as the RF solutions in my area suck. Probably due to all the country-western and religious stations taking up every second MHz on the dial.
- Matt

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Many of the newer radios have a minature telephone jack on the face to connect an MP3 player.
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"Matt Stachoni" wrote in message

Don't ask me how, but my 01 Dodge RAM seems like it came iPod ready. :)
The Aiwa AM/FM/Cassette/(mp3)CD player has a _front_ mounted stereo input jack, and that whole unit sits right next to a recess in the dash that the iPod fits in as if it were made for it.
A 6" patch cord completes the connection.
Those iPod FM transmitters sounds terrible to my ears, hardly any bass whatsoever.
The only other solution for the iPod I've found that is sonically acceptable, and I am relatively picky, is one of those cassette adaptors that allows you to play a portable CD player through the auto cassette deck ... not as good being able to plug directly into the unit, a la Aiwa, but _much_ better than the FM transmitter route, IMO ... and a whole lot cheaper.
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Hm. Well, that settles it then. Obviously, to hear my iPod on the road, I need a new truck.
Off to tell SWMBO. Thanks!
- Matt
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Matt Stachoni wrote:

Try these guys for a solution:
<http://www.logjamelectronics.com/
They had a device that allowed me to connect MP3 and XM devices to my 2005 Toyota factory stereo for about $80. MUCH, MUCH better quality sound than FM modulators.
To use the device, I simply select disc 1, track 1, on the changer, with no disc in the slot.
Installation required no splicing and only about 30 minutes. The device plugged into the "data bus" on the back of the head unit.
Barry
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The Motion Picture Experts Group Layer 3 audio encoding is lossy - it doesn't maintain the fidelity of the original. Good enough for a portable player, and perhaps the car; but not for the main stereo system, IMO.
Better (but requires much more disk space) is to keep the 16-bit PCM audio tracks directly.
Even better, get a couple of sony 400 disk changers, link them together and with random play you'll get random access to the songs on over 800 cds. Since one player can select a disk and track while the other is playing, and they switch players with no delay, continuous random tunes.
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At the risk of being mass-plonked for firmly pulling this thing way off topic, I have to comment a bit on the above. First of all digital is, by definition, lossy. A CD is NOT a perfect representation of a recording. On the flip side of that coin, any digital format that does not meet or exceed CD specs is NOT automatically one with poor fidelity.
I've bought quite a bit of stuff from various on-line music vendors and have yet to hear any compression artifacts like I would with lower bit-rate files. Now, I don't have a $10,000 system, but I do have some pretty nice headphones as well as a decent home and car system. But then again I'm no audiophile... I listen to the MUSIC, and not the equipment.
I think a digital library has a lot of benefits that may outweigh the (perceived) loss of fidelity. In addition to the space savings - no small thing when considering listening in a car, you can have easy smartlists/playlists, crossfades, prioritized songs, near-instant purchase ability, portability, etc. Metadata goes a long way to improving the listening experience. The software that handles this type of thing is getting better all the time (check out http://pandora.com sometime), and there are even a few decent consumer-level 10 foot interfaces now.
Just my two cents.
-John in NH
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"John Girouard" wrote in message

Lots of nitpickers pick lots of nits on this topic. Suffice to say, and despite owning a commercial recording studio and engineering literally hundreds of albums in the past 30 years, many with names you would recognize, I agree wholeheartedly with your statement. If I so choose, I can hear it "exactly as it sounded when mixed in the studio", but properly rendered MP3's are simply a marvel of technology in my book, and damn hard to beat for "portability".
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On Tue, 08 Nov 2005 19:07:31 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

with a decent bitrate of rip the fidelity is well above the threshhold at which I can detect errors. my hearing, like probably many of the regulars here, has been compromised by power tool noise...

I have a 260GB hard drive for music. it holds something like 50,000 .mp3 files. and yes I have to run it through a computer to play, but a computer really should be a part of any home entertainment system these days.
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