cast iron kettle

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Maybe I wasn't clear on where it is. It sets in my shop on my shop woodburning stove and is used to humidify the room. It is a conversation piece to some minor degree but earns its keep as a humidifer. I also do some cooking in the shop from time to time on the woodburning stove and would like to get it where I can make a cup of hot tea from the water in the kettle (just for the heck of it, I have a microwave in the shop that works well for that). The rust doesn't hurt the function of the kettle but I would like to get rid of it mainly because it shouldn't be there. I try to keep all of my tool is working condition and the rust just doesn't seem right.
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I would use an unglazed pottery dish for humidification, or a Pyrex one if that is available (much easier to clean than poetry, but the effective evaporating area is much smaller - pottery/terracotta "sweats".
Switch to the teakettle if you want to make tea, but otherwise keep the cast iron dry.
All free advice guaranteed or triple your money back.
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Best regards
Han
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Curran Copeland wrote:

In actual usage, the kettle would have been dried between uses, not left w/ standing water, hence the rust would not have sufficient time to form. As you've noted, boiling water for sufficient time will remove the protective grease in the pores of a previously seasoned skillet or other cast iron utensil.
The only real suggestion I would have if you want to try to use it as a continuous evaporator would be to use one of the zinc-converting treatments on the inside to minimize the rusting potential. Of course, I would then no longer even consider using it for cookware.
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I think using the tea kettle is basicaly a lost cause because of the rust. I will try to coat the inside one of these days. I am not familiar with the zinc process could you give more information? I agree that zink is not a good for cookware.
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On Sun, 18 Nov 2007 08:51:04 -0600, "Curran Copeland"
If you wonder why you're having a problem with rust, go back 100 years and research steam locomotives. Steam (and the production process leading to it) is extremely corrosive. There are lots of pictures around of the insides of boilers (not just locomotives) in need of overhaul. They are not pretty. The battle against the effects of steam on running gear was constant. You should expect nothing less with your tea kettle.
I guess my suggestion (as others have) would be to retire it, season it, and let it sit out for your conversation piece without actual use. Find another vessel or method for humidification.
By the way, if you actually do use it occasionally for tea preparation ignore any of the advice to coat the insides with WD-40 or the like. Petroleum distillates are not considered "good eats."

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LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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"Curran Copeland" wrote:

You can use marbles or pea gravel.
Any pot that is used as a humidifier, will form calcuim desposits in the bottom of the pan as a residue formed by the evaporation process.
The marbles roll around the bottom an prevent the deposits from clinging to the bottom of the pot.
My guess is to prevent the rust, you will not bel able to let the pot go dry.
Lew
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Curran Copeland wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacrificial_anode http://www.boatzincs.com / http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/pages/WHRpages/English/Longevity/water-heater-anodes.html
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Ron Hock
HOCK TOOLS www.hocktools.com
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wrote:

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wrote:

The Japanese have been using cast iron teapots called Tetsubins for centuries. Cast iron is still the teapot of choice for the Japanese tea-drinking purist. It seems that the small amount of iron introduced into the water improves the flavor.
All the use and care instructions for Tetsubins I have seen warn to empty the pot and dry thorougly after each use to avoid rust. They specifically warn against leaving water standing in the pot. If there were an easy way to avoid the problem, I'm sure they would have found it by now.
DonkeyHody "In theory, theory and practice are the same, but in practice they are not."
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Thanks everyone for the answers, I think my best move will be to find the old enamel teapot I put up some where, put a few lose marbles in it, if I can find mine, and retire the cast iron one for the time being.

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wrote:

If you like the look of the cast iron tea kettle, you could always try to find a stainless steel cylinder of an appropriate size that will fit inside the mouth of the kettle, and just put the water in the cylinder.
Granted it probably won't work so well as a water-pourer, but it should maintain the aesthetics of the shop and keep the inside of the pot from getting rusty.
-Nathan
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