Casing windows with Harditrim

I'm trying to decide on siding for a new house and am considering Hardiplank with batten boards. My question is how I should trim the windows, door, corners. Since the plank is flat should I just side around the windows and doors first and follow with the harditrim over the plank. Or is it the preferred method to trim first and butt the plank to the trim? It seems like it would be easier/cleaner to trim over the plank, but there must be a drawback to doing it this way.
Thanks, Mike
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FWIW, my home had Hardie installed by the builder - they sided first, then trimmed windows & doors. BTW, trim is NOT Hardie, but Cedar - good choice IMHO - can be painted just as well as any other material, or finished any other way you may opt. It's also a whole lot easier to mount whatever you may decide you want to (screens, awnings, etc.) later on if you're dealing with wood instead of cement board.
Just my opinion. NGA

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And some folks are using composites made of various PVCs and some wood fiber, for the same reasons. There's lots of ways to skin this cat, and keep things straight and pretty. Do your homework some.
Patriarch
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Depends... if you want it to look like a traditional siding job up close, rather than from the curb, trimming the windows first and then siding is the way to go. Alternatively, if you trim over the siding you could chalk the laps to eliminate the gaps. Doing neither would leaves a gap at each lap that doesn't appeal to me.
I trimmed my house with the Hardi 5/4" trim and then sided it. I also cheated the courses so that a full width course is above and below windows--a trivial amount was needed. It looks like a good wood siding job from the curb and up close most people wouldn't notice that the siding is thinner than wood so the shadow lines aren't quite as pronounced.
I've posted a relatively close shot of a part of my house on rec.woodworking so you can see a job done in all fiber cement with the courses cheated and the trim done first.
John
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After thinking about this a bit I'm wondering if you meant HardiePanel instead of Hardieplank? That would be a different issue... trimming over HardiePanel would probably be OK.
John
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wrote:

Yep it's HardiPlank. I'm assuming since the panel is 9x4' and there isn't any overlap that the trim over plank is the way to go. Also is Hardi better than Certainteed. I see they both sell similar products.
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I'm assuming you meant the HardiePanel which comes in sheets vs the HardiePlank which is lap siding... As such, I'd go with installing the trim over it. It would be a nightmare trying to scribe the sheets to fit around the trim... no matter how plumb and square you think your structure is you need to be able to cheat things!
You can get fiber cement trim thinner than 5/4" so doing that shouldn't be a problem.
RE brand, I'd go with whatever one is available from a reliable local dealer. In my case it was James Hardie material... Alternatively, shop for price and worry about the service later!
You don't mention how much you need, but you might want to check to find out if the material ships in standard units vs. per piece. I found that buying full units resulted in a 20% price break. Though I had some left I came out way ahead in cost.
John
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