Casing doors

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Very interesting to see. The one I have is avery early-predecessor of that one. Much lighter, with probably a bit more wobble in it. It encases the saw blade though, like yours, just not to the same degree of precision (I'm sure). I haven't looked around the back for a hex-nut adjustment mechanism to set angles other than those with detents! : ) But the saw was a gift, and I'm glad to have it.
Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Interesting tools. http://pecktool.com/download/PeckTool_Catalog.pdf
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If your door is "standard", it is 80". A molding 1.25 thick and 2" wide is wierd. Is this a casing mold or a brick mold? If for an interior passage door, I sure wouldn't want it.
Either of your nail lengths should be fine. I've done very few doors other than mine but I prefer to use screws and face grain plugs.
I've never glued mitered casing (in fact, I've rarely used mitered casing) but it would help keep them together. Those spring clamps are often used by picture framers; I never used them when I was making same because they leave deep gouges.
Whether or not one needs/should blunt nail points depends upon whether or not what you are nailing through tends to split. ____________________________
In a perfect world, the side jambs would be perfectly vertical and parallel to each other and they would be at right angles to the top jamb; all would be flush to the wall surface on each side.
It isn't a perfect world.
Because it isn't a perfect world is why casings are relieved on the back...the hollow between the two edges helps bridge too thick drywall. That relief also means that you need to nail through the non-relieved part to avoid the possibility of splitting the casing down the middle.
Because it isn't a perfect world is also the reason I avoid mitering casing. Instead, I use corner blocks...the ends of the casings are cut square and of the proper length to align with the reveal. The open square left is then filled with a slightly thicker and larger square piece of wood; thicker so it will be proud of the jambs; larger so it will be wider than the jambs on both edges. A "stopper". Corner blocks often have a decorative rosette; I don't have a rosettes cutter so I just rout a decorative edge all around.
Final thought: if the mold you intend to use is actually 1.25 x 2, how are you going to open the door? The pivot point of the door hinges should be far enough out so that the door can open fully without interference from the molding.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

described the molding around an entry way (to the kitchen) adjacent to it, where the actual door lies 5" or so inward.

I've been "sweating that miters" ever since I took the old one molding down! Though the fellow who did the previous installation didn't sweat it--he just left a 3/8" gap inside the miter I guess that's why I didn't hesitate to discard it.

like they should be of standard size (s) --like 2 3/4" square) but I like your idea of using "corner blocks" (much better than my chances of cutting perfect miters!) I'll investigate further.
Thank you very much for your helpful and interesting post!
Bill
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On 7/30/2013 4:02 PM, Bill wrote:

Two leg miters are really not that difficult. as you only have one width to worry about, the distance across the door. Your problems really begin on four sided miters, like a picture frame. If the side pieces are a little long or short the extra material can be accounted for at the bottom of the door. That is what quarter round is for.
I cut my miters on a table saw, using a triangle miter gauge. Coarse cut the miter on the table saw, then do a shave cut on the table saw to get the precision.
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NP. One thing...in this part "The open square left is then filled with a

The word "jamb" should be "casing".
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dadiOH wrote:

door casing all-in-one kit using your model (but it's MDF so I'm not going to use that particular kit).
I'll let you know how it comes out! : ) I think I'm going to start by re-shimming the door (read my other most-recent post)...
Bill
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