Casements around wide entry opening question??

Have a customer that wants some of their entries into dinning room and family room enclosed with casements and trim. In California they're building these upper end homes with curved outside edge detail on the drywall. It's a real pain in the ass to deal with. Anyone know if a trim molding is available to deal with this? I have not been able to find anything and just wonder if anyone has. I asked if I could use right angles instead and they were adamant about keeping this detail. Guess I could handle it like the base trim, (cutting small piece at 22 1/2 degree) and make it myself. I have posted pics on a.b.p.woodworking for clarification along with a dinning room I just finished.
Rich
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evodawg wrote:

Rich
Check out http://www.trim-tex.com /
Just what you're looking for and a lot more.
Easy to work with and opens up a world of possibilities
Bob C
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Bob C wrote:

Thanks Bob. Not exactly what I was looking for but none the less a good resource for the trim they offer for base molding.
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I know the feeling. We've been trimming those round corners for some time now. We've seen several different ideas from the 22 1/2 technique to transition pieces installed by the sheetrock guys that convert the round to square at the bottom of the corner. The latest idea is a transition piece that the trim carpenter installs after installing the trim. You make a 90 degree corner, leaving that little void that you can stick your finger in. Instead of your finger, you slide in a little plastic piece that has the round shape on the back and a square corner on the front with a small lip that sits on the trim. It transitions upward at a slight angle from the square front to the round back and gets painted with the wall. It can be used on base or crown since they just stick with a little glue. Very slick idea if your customer can live with a square corner...... or won't pay to 22 1/2 around it.

I'm having a hard time understanding what you are after. Are you wanting to jamb and trim the opening that is now covered with rock and round corners?
If so and you want to try to maintain the round look, could you use a thicker jamb material and put a big round over on each edge of the jamb? With a thicker jamb you should still have enough material to nail the trim to the jamb with the radius corners exposed. Basically it would be the same look as if you held a piece of trim up the wall with the round (sheetrock) corners exposed....except that now the exposed corners would be wood.
Mike O.
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Mike O. wrote:

Yes
Well I wanted to use MDF but I don't think the nail will hold and the nail will probably have to be countersunk deep so the round over does not contact it. But yes this is what I figured I'd have to do. Customer is still not sure if they want flat panel or raised panel on the jamb. Do you have a picture of a drywall rounded outside corner with crown installed on it. Inside corners are not an issue of course. Still a little confused on your solution above, with the little plastic piece. Picture tells at least a few stories. Up to this point I have not had to install crown on an outside corner with this rounded drywall edge treatment. And not looking forward to it.
Rich
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I don't right now. Basically it's done the same as running base around them...except upside down and on a ladder.;-) Normally we use the 22 1/2 method and the little pie piece of crown with 22 1/2 on each end makes the turn.

I can get a picture of those tomorrow if I can remember. I'll post them after work.
The solution actually came from the sheetrock company. They used to install a transition piece over the round corner that turned the bottom few inches into a square corner. It was applied after the round corner and mudded in while they were finishing. That method left too large a build up of mud and they also had to know how high the piece was to be installed depending on the size of the baseboard. We've seen them have to change all the corners in a house because they didn't get this part right. Now, with these little pieces, the size of the base doesn't matter because they are inserted after the base is installed. Personally, with large base, I kinda like the look of the 22 1/2 pie going around the round corner. The whole idea of making a transition back to square at the bottom (or top for crown) is just a labor/price issue for the builders.

You get the hang of it after the first one. It does make the crown look nice because the pie piece gets wider toward the ceiling. It still takes about twice as long to go around a round corner... no matter how good you get at it.
Mike O.
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Mike O. wrote:

That makes sense.

That be cool. But I can see now from your statement above how that works. I just have a problems cutting crown more than you have to, but with that rounded corner what choices do you have?

Understand that.

Like crown doesn't take long enough. Although I have gotten faster at it, its not something I do everyday. Cutting that tiny pie must be a pain. Meaning that blade is getting awful close to that finger.... So the start of the pie would be the same as if you're doing baseboard?
Rich
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Right. You can cut one 22 1/2 first on a long piece and cut the other 22 1/2 of the end. At least you have something to hang on to. Of course usually that little piece gets thrown across the room.;-)
Mike O.
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Mike O. wrote:

LMAO You got that right. Don't know how many times that has happened!!
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I posted the pic for the transition piece. You will see the plastic part and then see it installed.
Mike O.
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Mike O. wrote:

Where is it posted? I'm not seeing it in a.b.p.woodworking. Maybe my filter is working to well.
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Well, I guess I'm too stupid to get it posted. I got an error from my server that it was too large so I split the limit but then it uploaded in 21 pieces!.. Then even after recovering and joining the pieces it would not show me the pic. I'll have to try again.
Mike O.
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See if you can find it now. Man that was embarrassing!!!
Mike O.
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I saw an episode of This Old House not long ago where they were doing something like this. They had a carpenter there that cut little pieces of the trim at a precise angle to get the exact curve he wanted. He glued them together, then filled, sanded, primed and finished them. Excellent work, but quite time consumptive. They also mentioned PVC molding on that episode as a possible alternative to all of that work, and it made a very nice finished looking edge.
Here's a link to a discussion group on it, perhaps you can find more information with what you can glean from this. http://advice.thisoldhouse.com/showthread.php?tD42
Best of luck and be sure to post some photos of your finished project!
Kate
Have a customer that wants some of their entries into dinning room and family room enclosed with casements and trim. In California they're building these upper end homes with curved outside edge detail on the drywall. It's a real pain in the ass to deal with. Anyone know if a trim molding is available to deal with this? I have not been able to find anything and just wonder if anyone has. I asked if I could use right angles instead and they were adamant about keeping this detail. Guess I could handle it like the base trim, (cutting small piece at 22 1/2 degree) and make it myself. I have posted pics on a.b.p.woodworking for clarification along with a dinning room I just finished.
Rich
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Kate wrote:

I'll check it out, thanks. Rich
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I Googled: round corners trim molding pvc Here's a starter...
Aztec PVC Moldings:
http://www.vintagewoodworks.com/azekmouldings.html
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