Case work\chest of drawers question

I am designing a bedroom dresser. It is generally Arts and Crafts \Stickley looking. The sides will be post legs, say 2 1/2" square with frame and panel. Also frame and panel back. I have questions about attaching the dust frames (is that what they are called?) to the sides and back.
On solid side cases you typically see a dado or sliding dovetail. When I look at a stickley piece where the dust frame hits the leg I just see a butt joint. What technique is typical?
- Would I have a stopped dado and a notch in the frame? - Would I do the same at front and back? - Or would I use a M&T into the legs - I suppose attachment to the side frame as well. Would it de a shallow dado or a ledger under? - What about across the back
Similar in configuration to this (inexpensive) eBay piece http://tinyurl.com/y9ysgyy
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Twin tennon into the legs.
http://tinyurl.com/yeprh7u
(Second to last diagram on the page)
For the back, a Dado will work just fine.
Regards,
Steve

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Cool

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On 2/12/2010 12:07 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

FWIW, I've studied antiques from this style from this period at every opportunity down through the years. Here are my observations on the mounting of "drawer frames" in frame and panel carcase construction.
Traditionally this component is called a "drawer frame", and, in chest of drawers in particular, they are often made with horizontal "dust panels" floating in grooves in the "drawer frame" sides.
(In desks, and those pieces with only one drawer, or one row of drawers, these floating "dust panels" are often left off).
The "drawer frames" themeslves are most often mounted into a shallow dado cut into the insides of the four legs.
In the back legs, the dado is almost always a "stopped" dado.
In the front legs, this dado (or sliding dovetail in some instances) can be a "through" dado, with the front piece of the "drawer frame" made from the primary material, exposed, and showing the joinery.
Alternately, a stopped dado is used.
In this case, the drawer frame is made of secondary wood, but the secondary material stopping around 3/4" from the front of the legs. Then a 3/4" piece of primary material is glued to the front edge the drawer panel, and cut so as to be butted against insides of the legs and just in front of the stopped dadoes.
This gives you what appears to be a butt joint, as you mentioned above.
The drawer frame itself is rarely attached to the back, and most often stops just short of the back itself, regardless if the type of carcase construction.
FWIW ...
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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:

------------------------ SFWIW:
Modified one of Norm's designs on NYW to build a maple chest to include dust panels.
Used 1/4" floating Birch ply panels and 3/4x2-1/4 rails.
Overall impressions:
Gives that "built like a tank" feeling to the piece.
Some dust still gets in.
I liked the results.
Would use the technique again.
Lew
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I will add this comment to the discussion.
Another reason for dust panels in dressers is that the wife will not even consider a dresser without them. She is old school. Quality dressers always had them. Quality dressers still have them. And anything that doesn't have dust panels, by definition, are junk.
And if you disagree with her on matters of "quality", you are in big trouble.
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On 2/12/2010 7:53 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Women are like they, they don't want to even consider the possibility of the 'cache' of the dirty underwear drawer mixing with their dainty stuff ... no matter the odds.
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I recall once an old pair of my underwear that were streached out, had a broken wast band, and having several more holes than what they came with being found in that dainty stuff drawer. I did'n put'em there, honest.
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Snip
Do you think the dust panels do much? Not really sure of the purpose. Maybe houses were dusty in the past?
1. When building the drawers or panels out of a softer wood the constant sliding in and out over the years will actually create a dust from the softer wood wearing down. The residue looks like you have been in there sanding. The dust frame will prevent that dust from falling down into the lower drawer. 30 years ago I built a dresser with out the "dust frames/web frames" and the pine sided drawers have worn down and produced this dust which is often found on top of the contents of the lower drawers.
2. It helps keep the contents of the over filled drawer from being tangled up with the upper drawer.
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I plan on using a hardwood side rail with a dado in the drawer side and also a guide under the drawer.
Good point on the tangle issue.

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Give it a few more decades. The best low-friction solution is to mismatch the woods, like a hardwood against a softwood (otherwise the similar sap can cause adhesions). For heavy drawers, that matters. Resinous woods (teak, lignum vitae, mahogany, ipe) are somewhat self-lubricating, but paste wax is easy to reapply through the years.
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wrote:

Give it a few more decades. The best low-friction solution is to mismatch the woods, like a hardwood against a softwood (otherwise the similar sap can cause adhesions). For heavy drawers, that matters. Resinous woods (teak, lignum vitae, mahogany, ipe) are somewhat self-lubricating, but paste wax is easy to reapply through the years.
Yeah I don't think so. The chest of drawers with the mismatch of soft and hard wood is 30 years old and the dust continues to form as the drawer sides continue to wear down and the drag is as objuecional as it was in 1980. OTOH chests with drawers built 24 years ago with same hard woods for all parts show no wear at all and are silky smooth to open and close.
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On Fri, 12 Feb 2010 10:07:07 -0800 (PST), "SonomaProducts.com"

It would be nice to see the inside the case with drawers removed. I would expect the frame between the drawers to include grooves that hold the dust panel. I suspect the frames include tenons that fit into mortises cut in the leg posts. Support the back frame there onto the back muntin, if it is there.
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