Case of the overgrown insert?

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Anyone have a clue why a zero-clearance insert would suddenly grow too big to fit in the table? The insert I use for dadoing no longer fits the saw opening. I grabbed an unused, though otherwise identical insert, and it fits just like it was meant to. I ended up making another dado insert, wasting a $20 blank. :-( These blanks were from Woodcraft, BTW.
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"krw" wrote:

Don't have a clue, but why not spend a little time with a file or some sandpaper and rework till it fits?
BTW, cold day in hell when I'd spend $5, much less $20 for a T/S insert.
At least not as along as I had 1/4 hardboard scraps, double back tape, a router and some C-Clamps.
Lew
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On Sun, 1 Nov 2009 17:28:08 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

The edge isn't just MDF. Not sure what it is but it's sorta rubbery, I guess to keep it in the table. It seems like it's now at least a 1/16th too long.

They were on sale. They're now $24.95 in their catalog. ;-)

When I get time in the shop I'd rather make something more interesting than a table saw insert. Getting them to fit well takes time I'd rather spend doing something else.
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Like fiddling with a store bought insert that doesn't fit?
R
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*wiping monitor*
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On Sun, 1 Nov 2009 17:49:13 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

It certainly *DID* fit. It wouldn't have had the dado silhouette in it if it hadn't. It's brother still fit.
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I don't understand. Making inserts is not a big deal and it doesn't take a lot of time. A router, a template, zip zip zip. And there wouldn't be any question of the thing growing or shrinking. Like Lew said, the double stick tape makes knocking them out trivial. Five or six at a time. What's that in store bought dollars?
In any event I have no idea what happened to your insert unless you got it wet. Contact Woodgraft...errr, Woodcraft and express your disappointment. They'll probably send you a new one.
R
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On Sun, 1 Nov 2009 18:48:40 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

Does the router template add the thickness adjustment screws? What's an hour of my free time worth?

It is in the garage but hasn't been near any water. Good suggestion, though. I'll send Woodcraft a note. I looked at it again this evening (thought I might have gotten the tab hung up underneath, or something) and yep, it's abut 1/16" long. The other fits in there like it was supposed to. They've been sitting on the same shelf next to each other since I last used the dado insert.
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On Sun, 1 Nov 2009 18:48:40 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

Just out of interest's sake, what's the popular method for getting those inserts to sit level with the tablesaw top? My danged tablesaw insert cavity has a certain depth that defies my finding some wood or other material making insert construction easy.
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com said:

I use 1/2" ply and thread 4 allen head set-screws into it over each saw table leveling boss. A 3/8" brass rod out the rear hooks the sawtop lip to prevent the blade from lifting the insert and throwing it through the wall. Inexpensive saws may not have leveling bosses (i.e. Delta 32-600 and some Craftsman).
Greg G.
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Just slightly undersized holes and the allen screws create their own thread as they're inserted?
My table saw leveling bosses are about 3/8" in depth. I suppose that would be enough thread for allen screws to grab.
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote: ...

Ayup...
Ayup...
:)
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said:

I simply used 4, 3/8" long #6 flat head screws. They will screw flush on the bottom side if needed. and no pre drilling needed. Because they never needed to be readjusted being on the bottom side is not really a draw back.
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I don't use anything but a zero clearance insert I made and don't find this to be a problem. I epoxied washers in place. There's no stress on 'em - just trying to keep them from sliding. After that the inserts are all uniform.
R
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I do the same except with 1/2" Lexan.
Luigi
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I'm with you.
I browse through the wood working catalogs and am amazed by the number of things for sale - and which, apparently, are frequently purchased - which anyone could easily make for themselves.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

I'm with both of you.
I wonder of there's a correlation between the skill level/experience of a woodworker and how many shop-made (as opposed to store bought) jigs they have.
I can find arguments for both sides, but I still wonder.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

I think there might be a stronger correlation between number of shop-made jigs and size of the tool budget. :)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

That's probably much more accurate. :-)
Personally, if time isn't the first motivator (as in, I don't have even ten minutes to go buy this thing), price is.
Just about every jig I see in the shop was built because I looked on-line or in a catalog, and my first reaction was, "HOW much!? Geez, I can *make* that."
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I never tossed out a jig, unless it was just cobbled together for a single use and then taken back apart and tossed back in the bucket with other pieces. If the jig was something I would reuse, such as one I built for over the table sander to bevel the edges of coasters, then it was stored on a shelf for reuse. Those are the ones that built up over the years.
--
Nonny

Have you ever wondered if the bills
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