Carrying plywood with small car

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pduck wrote:

I did something similar when I had my '89 Chevy Cavalier, except that it was a kitchen table Mom had just bought. We picked it up at the store and some of the workers there pulled out their roll of industrial shrink-wrap and shrink-wrapped the table to the roof (doors were open during this - closeing the doors only helped tighten up the whole thing). Damn table didn't even move an inch the whole way home.
- Mike
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I have a hombrew roof rack made from a couple of 10-foot 2x4s joined with 2x4 cross pieces into sort of an H with a double crossbar. It's padded with carpet padding to protect the car and the wood. It attaches to the frame of the car front and rear with nylon tie-down straps and I use some screw-down wooden blocks along with cord to hold the plywood wood in place.
I don't take it on the highway, and I don't suppose I'd want to drive 50 miles with it, but I've got a couple plywood sources with 10 or so miles of me that require driving no faster than about 40 MPH and for those it works fine. I've probably had it for 10 years, carrying plywood and sheetrock and I've never lost anything from it yet.
On 4 Jan 2004 11:39:18 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (pduck) wrote:

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I

Yakima racks (www.yakima.com) lists two different roof racks that would fit your make and model. They're not cheap but I've been very happy with mine over the last 20 years on three different vehicles hauling bikes, canoes, kayaks and lots and lots of wood.
Allen Catonsville, MD
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Mis-snipped and wrongly replied (it was pduck who asked about the Celica; I drive a Mazda Protege), but no harm done.
But I can add that one other nice thing about my 2x4 model is that it cost me about $10.
On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 11:32:16 -0500, Allen Epps

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Can't seem to find it right now, but a few years ago I saw a carryall setup for cars. It hangs outside of /clamps onto the passenger side door/open window and permits the carrying of sheets of plywood immediately beside the car.
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And you can see to turn/change lanes how??
Shawn
On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 21:36:03 GMT, Upscale wrote:

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Actually, that's a good question. Most cars are over four feet high aren't they? I think the front leading part of the plywood was slightly south of the front leading edge of the passenger door.

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And obviously you don't drive the interstates that much. It don't matter if they can see to change lanes or not, most people just do. No turn signal, no indication, no nothing. Let's just see if I can fit between this tanker and the truck following him, I have to get off of my exit!!!! Don't get me started about cars and lane changing's!
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When I drive it's only city driving and the carry all I'm talking about certainly wasn't meant for high speed driving. I believe it was designed for a 30-40 mph trip home. Let me do a little searching and see if I can find a link to one.
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On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 11:32:16 -0500, Allen Epps

Be really careful with Yakima and Thule racks, along with impostors, when carrying sheet goods.
The manufacturers recommend tying any load that extends beyond the front lip of the windshield to the bumper. Wind coming off the hood an windshield can be scooped and compressed under the load, adding all kinds or weird stresses to the racks. I've been to Yakima's "Rack Dog" training, and they really drill it in, including showing plenty of "oops!" material from people who ignored the recommendation.
They are great racks though!
Barry
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It is possible to carry 4'x8' sheets in a Citroen 2CV - and cars don't come much smaller. Just remove all the seats except the driver's (3 minutes work at most) roll the roof right back, and you stand the sheets on their ends from above. Tranported as many as 6 sheets that way. The great thing is the car cannot travel fast enough for the plywood aerodynamics to become a problem. I loved that car!
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