Carbide tipped turning tools

I know there are a few turners that hang out here from time to time.
I'm a new turner with a Rikon mini lathe and a pretty full set of HSS tools. Took a bowl turning class a few weeks ago and had a chance to try out a carbide tipped gouge. Sweet. I've had a few bad catches using the bowl gouge -- a couple sent the blank flying across the shop.
So ... I'm thinking about adding a carbide gouge to my toolset. Do you use them? If so, any thoughts about Easy, Hunter or others?
Larry
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On 10/13/2012 11:34 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

I have the had a lathe for 30 plus years, two actually, and never really got the bug. I have 10~15 tools for turning, many came with the lathes. 6 weeks ago I got the Easy Wood Tools Easy Rougher, Easy Finisher, and the Easy Detailer. I MAY NEVER USE ANY OF THE OTHER TOOLS AGAIN.
Those 3 tools should satisfy 99% of your turning needs unless you get into turning vessels that have narrow openings. Easy Wood Tools has tools for that application too.
Basically I think you cannot go wrong with these replaceable carbide tip tools.
If you can operate a finish sander you will be a pro with the Easy Wood Tools on your first turning. They are that easy. Oh and so far knots in the wood are a non issue, they cut just like regular wood.
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wrote:

This is a knowledgeable group and you'll get good info here, but you might also try:
rec.crafts.woodturning
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On 10/14/2012 10:55 AM, Zz Yzx wrote:

Normally I would agree with the woodturning group. These replaceable carbide tipped tools are relatively new in so much that a few styles replace a load of conventional tools. Long time turners may be biased towards the traditional tool. Think about the SawStop way of reasoning and discount or leave out personal bias against the inventor.
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"Leon" wrote

Well, if you spent a couple thousand hours sharpening your tools, you would probably be upset that somebody came along with a new fangled invention that made you look so OLD! They put in their time. They paid their dues. And now, it may not be necessary any more.
Personally, I think it would help woodturning. Not having to spend all that time sharpening leaves more time for turning! It would open it up to folks who would never get into sharpening like the old timers had to.
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On 10/14/2012 2:21 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Absolutely! If you are already accomplished with the old there is not much reason to switch until you have finally ground down a tool to its demise. I too seriously believe the Easy Wood Tool type tools will increase the popularity. When you can immediately turn a bowl or goblet you are likely to stick with it.
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Gramp's shop wrote:

Carbide has a lot to recommend it. One reason for resistance to the carbide tools is, as others have said, they are new and us old coggers just ain't into that new fangled stuff. That aside,
Carbide has its place, but the selection of tools is still limited
With a good jig setup, sharpening is not a chore, (If you think it is, you really need to get a life).
HSS allows you to put an individual shape on your tools, rather than what someone else thinks you ought to have.
There is no carbide replacement for the skew. That alone should make you have a mix of tool types.
I have an Easy Rougher knock off and frankly never use it - finding the skew does everything better and as quick as the Easy (square bit).
So, really, its what you get used to and what you prefer.
Deb
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"Dr. Deb" wrote in message
Gramp's shop wrote:

Carbide has a lot to recommend it. One reason for resistance to the carbide tools is, as others have said, they are new and us old coggers just ain't into that new fangled stuff. That aside,
Carbide has its place, but the selection of tools is still limited
With a good jig setup, sharpening is not a chore, (If you think it is, you really need to get a life).
HSS allows you to put an individual shape on your tools, rather than what someone else thinks you ought to have.
There is no carbide replacement for the skew. That alone should make you have a mix of tool types.
I have an Easy Rougher knock off and frankly never use it - finding the skew does everything better and as quick as the Easy (square bit).
So, really, its what you get used to and what you prefer. ============================================================================Many have been putting down scrapers for years but now that they hang a chunk of carbide on the end, many are again praising the scraper.
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On 10/14/2012 4:44 PM, CW wrote:

Stays sharper longer and in the case of the rougher, 4 times longer with each new surface. I learned today how to resharpen those carbide bits with a diamond hone. These thing are sharp.
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On 10/14/2012 3:09 PM, Dr. Deb wrote:

I will say that I have read reviews of Easy Wood Tools "type" tools and the "knock offs" do not get as good of reviews as those of the Easy Wood Tools.

I personally tried, off and on, over the past 30 years to get used to the old style tools. I got pretty good with the rough in gouge. :~)
If you already are proficient with the conventional tools I can see how it would be a 50/50 chance of you switching. For those of us that are no,t the carbide tools eliminate the learning curve to almost zero.
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wrote:

If you just paid a gazillion dollars for a bogus tool, you'd hesitate letting the world know about your inept purchase, wouldn't you? It's embarrassing. (Unless you returned it immediately.)
The newest coupon in the Sunday paper today was from HF. Their multifunction tool is on sale for $15.99, for those who don't yet have one. Look at the wrapper for the totally useless USA Weekend "mag". It's a small 4-pg HF ad. Also, their 4-1/2" angle grinders are only $9.99 now. Pick up one of those and a Kutzall or Lancelot blade and go to town with a savage new power carver. ;)
http://www.kutzalltools.com/kutzall_products_categories.cfm?category_ID=6 http://katools.com / http://www.arbortech.com.au/view /
-- Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards. -- Vernon Sanders Law
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On 10/14/2012 8:28 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Maybe if you paid a gazillion. The knock off I read about was one that Rockler sells. I saw it on sale for about half the price of an Easy Wood tool. Way way south of $100. And to put that into perspective I suspect that most serious wood turners, those that turn daily, probably pay at least $100 for a typical tool.
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On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 19:34:45 -0500, Leon wrote:

Well, Mac Davis posted the following here a while back:
"I got the Woodchuck "Bowl-Pro" tool and I'm lovin' it.. Anyone that is considering the EX Rougher should go for Woodchuck tools by Ken Ferrel.. http://www.woodchuck-tools.com / The price on the tool was $65, which included 2 different size/radius carbide cutters.. Half the price of the EZ and the same tool.. I bought it to rough irregular ironwood blanks but in playing with it, I was even doing beads and curves with ease.. Used level like a scraper, you can hog out huge amounts of wood but I feel it really shines on light cuts.. Nice smooth cut, very little force on the tool rest and NO force or vibration on your hands.."
I'd call that a good review :-).
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On 10/15/2012 11:17 AM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Yeah! And where has Mac been lately?
I did not mean to indicate that Easy Wood Tools are the best of their kind so much as there are reviews of other brands that do not get favorable reviews. I am sure that there are equal and better versions.
I believe the biggest advantage to most of these type tools is that the bottom of the tool is flat. Most conventional turning tools have a curved bottom and the angle of attack is critical to getting good results and or not uncontrollably gouging/destroying the work. My wife turned a chunk of Arkansas Walnut, absolutely her firs time turning anything IIRC. The walnut had a gnarly open knoy and she cut right over it leaving a pristine smooth finish.
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wrote:

I got talked into buying one about 5 years ago and it does have the rounded bottom. I was told to find the sweet spot then flatten the bottom. Well I've chewed some stuff up but may have to give it another try. Problem for me is I think I'm backwards. I'm really comfortable with the skew chisel and once things are roughed out that tends to be my goto tool in various sizes. Actually getting ready to go weld some extensions on one of my wolverine jigs to get set up again. Got the deal from Tormek they had a promotion on so I can run both Wolverine and Tormek Jigs on my 8" Woodcraft slow grinder. I have the wet grinder as well but its fairly slow for lathe tools. New shop addition has the sharpening station next to the lathe.
Mike M
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On Mon, 15 Oct 2012 17:57:14 -0700, Mike M wrote:

I suspect that most of us who like the carbide tools are using them primarily for bowl turning. I know I am. The skew isn't much use there :-).
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On Tue, 16 Oct 2012 16:27:16 +0000 (UTC), Larry Blanchard

I'll give you that but when I flip the bowl and work the back there is nothig sweeter then a skew.
Mike M
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On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 23:34:07 -0500, Gramp's shop wrote:

Do a Google for Woodchuck lathe tools.
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