Can you thin Minwax Polyurethane?

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I tried to thin Minwax's Polyurethane with minerals spirit or paint thinner and I get congeal mixtures???
How do you thin Minwax Polyurethane? Thanks
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wrote:

follow the directions on the can?
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You should be able to thin up to 30% (using mineral spirits)...but that's it. Still, I'd try it, test it, let it dry and see how it does.
Good luck Rob
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The can says not to thin it though.
dwhite
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wrote:

Did you get a can of water based poly? That is what the reaction sounds like. I don't know if Minwax makes water base, but...

Mineral spirits should be the preferred option. I can't recall how much you can thin it. The ratio is probably listed on the can. That being said, I've thinned poly by 50% or more to get a mixture that will soak deep into the wood. It works very well for hardening pine desktops.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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wrote:
That was what I thought!

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you stir them in carefully, without introducing air into the mix.
Stir completely, for about 4 minutes, before starting to thin. And don't try to work with material that's too cold, either. Check the label, and maybe store the cans inside?
Patriarch
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On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 03:58:32 GMT, patriarch

I did not mixed the Polyurethane as I got it dirt cheap at an estate sales. When I opened the lid there is a thin harden layer, I add about 5% volume minerals spirit and cover it for 24 hrs. Hopping the minerals sprit will melt it. The next day I got congeal mixture, below the harden top layer!
There are not instruction of thinning, but cleaning with either minerals spirit or paint thinner. The instruction printed on the can "Do Not Shake" in bold letter, "Stir slowly......" why?
Thanks

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wrote:

So as to not induce air bubbles in the poly. Shaking will produce small air bubbles that will mess up your finish.
Thunder

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wrote:

May just be too old to be worth messing with. I incurred my Father-In-Law's wrath when I cleaned out the old paints and stuff from his shop. Some of those cans (half full) were more than 50 years old! I actually had to send some of it off to the hazardous waste facility because it was lead based.
Basically, if it is older than a year or so just chuck it and buy new.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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Geroge Barns wrote:

Polyurethane is a reactive finish. It cures by reacting with the oxygen in the air. Once it has reacted it can not be redissolved.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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What used to be my favorite mix (until I started using Waterlox) 1/3 minwax poly, 1/3 mineral spirits, 1/3 watco oil. If you are just going to thin to a wipeable consistancy, only go about 30% on the mineral spirits. Otherwise, you will need to use alot of coats to build up the material. Or get smart and use Waterlox like I do <g> SH
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I can only apply the Minwax polyurethane with a lint free cloth on the projects. After it dries, I either use #150 to #240 sand papers or #000 steel wool to get the finished I need. I may apply as many as 4 coats of polyurethane to get the finished I need. I would be more than happy to apply the least possible coats. It's extremely time consuming between each coat!
What is Waterlox and where can you buy them?
Thanks, a million :-)

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It is a tung oil based finish. You can buy online at www.waterlox.com or www.amazon.com carries it too I believe. I bought my last quart at Woodcraft. SH
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What is it you like about Waterlox? I've heard good things about it, but would value your opinion.
Dan White: I've read that finish manufacturers have reduced VOCs as ordered by the feds, and in order to comply, must label the can not to thin, since that would raise the VOCs and therefore, supposedly, air pollution.
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Thanks, Gary. I have to get started on my own poly project. I'm starting with the oil based Minwax though. I've got hard maple butcher block and am going to try some linseed oil at first, followed by maybe 3 coats of thinned gloss poly, finishing with a coat of maybe slightly thinned satin poly.
dwhite
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Have you try Minwax waterbase polyurethane, are they water resistance (ie, water resistance, after it dry)?
I check HD today they have Minwax for outdoor, can you comment that too? By the way what is VOCs?

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http://www.epa.gov/iaq/voc.html Google is your friend. www.google.com

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Yes.
I use their Helmsman Spar Urethane and have had good results with it.

Volitile Organic Compounds. This is the stuff that evaporates and may pollute the air.
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Missed the start of this thread...
Why not just use Minwax wiping polyurethane? You don't get the quick (thick) build that you get with the regular Minwax poly--which may or may not be an advantage--and it does wipe on nicely.
John
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