Can you joint on a planer?

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Rather than buying two machines, why cant you put boards on their edge and run them through a planer? Just a thought. I struggeling with the (Should I get aplaner or jointer first thing) I have acess to rough cut 1 inch thick lumber. It looks cut fairly straight. came from a flooring company.
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Because it would be difficult to keep a board standing on edge and especially when it is not a 90 degree edge to start with. If you have a TS you can easily straighten a board using a sled but only after flattening the board.
I think you will find a planer more useful. I use the planer to flatten rough cut boards with a sled.
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stryped wrote:

You can do it, yes.
But it's rather like teaching a pig to sing - the results aren't pretty and it annoys the hell out of the pig.
You can also joint with a router.
Gus
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stryped wrote:

I thought you could plane on a jointer but not joint on a planer? Something like that. There are jointer-planers and thickness planers IIRC. But I never used either so im only going from what I read.
I could use a planer myself. I see a dewalt power hand planer looks nice. Then mix in a router for the jointing and I should be set on the cheap :P
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What do you figure that power hand plane will do for you?

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CW wrote:

plane? Im not even sure how those things work. Regular hand plane is really good enough for me. I have an old rusty one that I need to rehabilitate, or maybe buy a new one.

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Well if you have a table saw you can joint on that if you make the jig for it, somewhere on the net is a free plan for one, I recently saw it from a previous post. You can also edge joint with a long hand plane like a Stanley No. 7 and a fence on it, and you can face joint on a jointer, as a planing task. Your choice what to buy for how you want to work. There is also (here and there) the Incra 570, like a Euro machine it does both jobs over and under using one cutter head, take a look, eB*y searcher: 7589185479.... in your situation I'd get an electric planer (for width of the boards) and a long hand plane with a fence if I didn't have a table saw, and I don't.
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IU saw that somewhere but could not understand how it worked. AAvK wrote:

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Ranger Paul seems to be an expert, with very realistic and professional opinions. But you can STILL joint on a table saw... I would use a thin kerf blade:
$1.95 for this jig plan: http://www.newwoodworker.com/tsjointjig.html Free from Workbench mag: http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2005/01/28/wb / A discussion thread: http://theoak.com/specific/msgtools2/484.html
That's all I could find,
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I can see problems using a thin kerf blade to straighten/joint a board. If cutting a minimum off of the board and only one side of the blade is doing the cutting which is VERY OFTEN the case when using a TS to straighten boards the blade is going to deflect more than normal.
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Fri, Feb 17, 2006, 5:48am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (stryped) doth wonder: x-no-archive:yes Rather than buying two machines, why cant you put boards on their edge and run them through a planer? Just a thought. I struggeling with the (Should I get aplaner or jointer first thing) I have acess to rough cut 1 inch thick lumber. It looks cut fairly straight. came from a flooring company.
Make a planer sled.
JOAT IThere is no vaccine against stupidity!
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There seem to be some misconceptions here. A jointer is specifically designed to make boards flat. A planer makes opposite sides parallel. If the board isn't flat when you start, it will only duplicate the shape of the face, bumps and all. Boards need to be jointed first, then planed to thickness. Bugs
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Bugs wrote:

Yeah, JOAT said to "Make a planer sled" in his post. This will allow you to effectively joint with a planer. It works, and it gives you a 12.5" jointer :)
-Mike
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With the proper sled it is entirely possible to flatten a board with a thickness planer.
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

Exactly. The combination of the board and sled has one side that's the sled and one side that's the board. The planer then does what it's designed to do, which in this case makes the board side parallel to the sled side. If the side of the sled is flat, then this will obviously make the side of the board flat.
- Brooks
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I've never tried it but.... some carpenters working in a house down the street from us would cut all of their closet cleats which were 3 1/2" wide, stand about four of them against each other and run them through the planer (standing on edge) to joint the edges. Being closet cleats I'm sure they weren't too concerned about the edges being square to the face but it worked for them. BTW, they didn't have a jointer on the job.
Mike O.
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You have to be pretty thick or stack as mentioned. I do it with door rails and stiles by stacking them and putting a c clamp on each end. I don't need to tell you the importance of naving the body of the clamp delow the knives AND the handle set so it stays horizontal and can't get up into the knives. It's scary the first couple of times. Of course you could also drill 1/4" holes near all the ends and stack with bolts. Stacking and securing this way allows you to force the pieces vertical and assures edges square to the faces. Wilson
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I did this with passage door stiles - 7' long, 3" wide and 1-1/4" thick (actually, bi-fold closet door panels, so didn't need the "regular" 1-3/8" thick stock).
Didn't stack them, just one at a time. I have CI infeed and outfeed on my planer, so probably 4' of material support at one time. No problems
I had my stock at final thickness, but the boards were about 7" wide, so I could rip them into two stiles. KNEW they would crook (hopefully not twist, and they didn't), so I cut them at 3-3/16". Re-jointed the newly-formed concave side :^) and then put them through the planer on edge to get to final 3" width.
-Chris
Wilson wrote:

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There is nothing to ensure square.

on
up
could
and
edges
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As others have described you can run boards on edge through a planer 'to clean up the edge' .... not the same as "jointing" the edge, however. It will not straighten the boards, only plane a smooth edge. If the opposite edge of the board isn't already straight, it will just follow the same curve due to the force of the pressure rollers. If as you say, it's fairly straight, you might be ok. Likewise, before thicknessing a board in a planer the face should first be flattened on a jointer.(assuming rough stock) While it is possible to create a sled for a planer that will allow you to adjust for cupping/twist etc., It would involve some effort to get it right. IMO Again, if it isn't flat on one side to begin with, the other side will just end up parallel to it, not necessarily flat.
Lenny http://www.geocities.com/lenhow / http://www.geocities.com/lenhow/Work
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