Can't drill a straight hole?

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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in

www. No luck. I then took a shower. I didn't turn off my laptop, and kept FF running. Just tried again. No problem accessing.
No idea what gremlins there were nor where they were.
Just FYI. <grin>.
--
Best regards
Han
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Another quick note: if you mark the wood with a center punch (I'm guessing an 'ice pick' is some sort of center punch), and you clamp the piece of wood to the table, then if the mark is not EXACTLY under the center of the drill, then it will pull the drill bit to the side which results in an angled hole. This is especially true for hard woods like maple, and long, thin drill bits.
There are a couple ways around this. First is to not clamp the piece to the table, and slowly lower the bit to the wood until it touches. This results in the bit pulling the wood towards the center, and you get less of an angle. The next is to clamp the wood let the drill bit spin when it's just touching the notch. Let it spin there for ten seconds or so. This way, if it's not exactly aligned, the drill bit will be able to cut the notch to a position closer to dead center.
When you think you have the notch centered, raise the drill bit, and then, looking very carefully from the side, lower the drill bit slowly. If the end of the drill bit shifts when it touches the wood, your notch is not centered. Repeat the steps above until it's centered. Only apply pressure on the drill press once the hole is exactly centered.
Even if you don't use a center punch, you should be careful when drilling the first 1/2mm to ensure the drill bit tip doesn't wander.
John
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To supplement a very useful posting, when drilling metal, I've realised that the centre punch needs to be accurately ground so that it makes a perfect conical indentation with the centre of the cone dead central with the circular outline of the dent.
If otherwise, the drill or the job will be slightly deflected as the drill starts to cut.
Jeff
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Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
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Use the proper bit for drilling a deep hole. That's the tip. What you want is either a Forstner bit or a good quality Brad Point bit. Don't use a spade or regular twist bit. Pen makers deal with this all the time but use quality bits suited for drilling deep straight holes.
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@swbell.dotnet says...

Leon, have you ever drilled a four inch deep hole with a 1/4 inch Forstner? If not you might want to give it a try.
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