Can I use a tree branch for wood?

Page 2 of 2  
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 23:59:39 -0500, Bob Flint

It is better for the tree to cut it off while the tree is dormant. Of course you can use it! A lot of woodworkers process fallen trees. Drying it without splitting is the trick !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ya... tell me!! I installed a de-humidifier in my shop (basement) and have the level down to 35%. I usually have to bundle together the wood I buy with these big steel double angle irons, and 1/2" x 12" bolts... and wait a few months before I use it... still get some twisters...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Once dried Sitka spruce by covering it with sawdust for about 6 months. Kept the sawdust less moist over time with water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A tree trunk grows under gravitational pressure running down the grain. If that pressure is "relieved", there is no natural tendency to warp. A horizontal tree branch grows with pressure running across the grain, and thus the tendency to warp once that stress is relieved.
Joe

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12 Feb 2004 08:47:46 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@execpc.com (BIG JOE) wrote:

So I've heard.... so either a full piece to retain the stress, or a veneer to eliminate stress...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

First my apologies for all the uninformed answers. A lot of people here are eager to be helpful, but the information can have a tendency toward being inaccurate. 1. Cut before the sap rises. 2.Branches contain "reaction wood". This can cause severe movement during drying. If reaction wood is used for woodworking projects it is often best to keep the pieceds small. 3.Processing a branch is the same as for a bole from the trunk. A. Fell B. quarter. This is simply using a maul and wedges to split the log into four sections. Always best to split as the split will follow the grain line. The grain line will be convoluted in a branch so be prepared to use short sections. A branch should be quartered since "through & through milling will only exacerbate the problems caused by reaction wood. C. Have the quarters cut by a sawyer. D. Stack the wood on a flat platform, sticker (horizontal spacer sticks laid down on the boards to keep air movement between the boards) and spacer (same as stickers but are placed on the vertical between the boards). E. Band or bind the stack. Banding is a steel strap that is pulled around the stack, binding is chain, cable or rope tightened around the stack. F.Cut a small section of a board and weigh it. Continue to weigh this section during the drying process. When the piece has stopped losing weight, it is as dry as you will get by air drying. Keep dates, and weight records. G. Kiln dry if necessary.
Best to keep the wood in a dark place when drying, and always keep the binders as tight as possible during the drying process. You will need to tighten periodically. This was a quick "Readers Digest" version of how to process, but you get the idea.
-Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12 Feb 2004 17:27:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnojunk (Sbtypesetter) wrote:

Did you read my other answer to this? I've found the sap is lost out of the wound. That tree is still alive, however, so I guess there is no real harm.

Since a lot of my projects are small furniture and stuff, I could limit pieces to 4 feet or even less. If I made a small cabinet, even 2 foot pieces are good, no?

I imagine. I once ripped a board into 2 propellers! Lots of stress in there.

Was hoping to keep this in my own hobby world... I've had very bad luck with the 'pros' around here screwing up my projects...

I already have a system of heavy steel double angles and bolts...

Thanks a lot!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

'Scuse me. a) Uninformed answers is all some of us have. 2) Thought every1 knew if You ask a question on Usenet, you get *advice* and *opinions*.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The other part must not have posted. "Some will be offended at this. They shouldn't it's just an observation and to be aware that much of the information offered is from the position of opinion, not experience."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mttt wrote:

III. Some have questions.
I've been dying all day to ask: "Is there any alternative?"
:-)
--
Morris Dovey
West Des Moines, Iowa USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I must admit, I kept my answer simple, but I fail to see how it was innacurate, or much different than yours in conclusion. I also don't see why you would apologize for other people's answers, other than if you are trying to sound patronizing. If not, my apologies as well.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Flint wrote:

My understanding is branches are loaded with "reaction wood." They've been growing against gravity for umpty-ump years, and there is no way you can make straight boards out of them.
Nonetheless, I have a walnut tree in my backyard with a branch that is too low and gets in the way of mowing etc. I'd like to cut off that branch, dry it for a year or two and use it.
The scar on my left hand from a table saw kickback accident with oak plywood makes me pause every time I plug one of my power tools in. Had things gone worse I'd have a much harder time playing piano or guitar. ;-)
Since my walnut branch is reaction wood I've given up on the idea of long boards out of it. However, I do think I could make a number of really neat small boxes (1' or smaller) from it after it is properly dried.
I'm thinking that a maple limb can be made into smaller pieces that are stable enough. If anyone else has better ideas I'm all ears.
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My new compound miter saw doe not kick back. It is a LN crosscut carcass saw. :-)
I have table saw scars also, but I still possess all my digits.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I got whacked by a piece of thin poplar plywood that got away from my radial arm saw while ripping,,, I saw it coming and shielded myself with my left forearm, which got cut from elbow to wrist, and smashed my right thumb... but I only got one cut on my chest... Hurt for a few months after that... Now I test the grabber very carefully and if it don't grab the work, I don't cut it!! At least the corner of my thumb eventually grew back!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Flint wrote:

[Shudders] Glad it wasn't any worse.
If I hit the lottery I'll do ripping with something like this: http://www.grizzly.com/products/item.cfm?itemnumber=G0524
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.