Can I save money on a shed if I build it?

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What I did was scope out the sheds at the shed shop, and build one similar.
No plans[*]. 8'x12', stud wall construction 24" o.c. 3/4" T&G floor on 2x8 joists on 24" centers with 2x12 PT frame resting on pre-existing concrete pad. T1-11 exterior, asphalt shingle roof (using 2x4 rafters). If I were to do it again, I'd use 1/2" or 3/4" sheathing on the roof rather than 3/8" (which may require beefier rafters) - but we have no snow load to worry about here. Installed a window on one of the long sides.
As it was to be used for hardwood lumber storage, I doubled up three of the studs on one long wall, notched them in three places (3/4" x 3.5" notch on facing sides of the studs) and bolted some short (18") 2x4s in the notches to support the lumber horizontally.
Total cost about $800 and two weekends vs. the shed shop's $2500.
[*] Well, I drew my own prior to construction and did a full scale floorplan on the living room carpet using masking tape to test out the dimensions and usability (door and window locations were constrained by the location of the shed). Do consider where your T1-11 exterior sheathing joints will end up vis-a-vis the studs in the studwall. DAMHIKT.
Good excuse to get a framing nailer.
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After looking at sheds built locally and the ones in a kit, I ordered plans for the one I liked and am now building it. I originally wanted a 12X16 with a gambrel roof, (spelling?) which would have cost me around $1500 to $1800 to be built by one of the companies here. I opted to change the plans I bought to make it 12X20 (would have cost $24-$2900 to have built) and figure the costs will be around $1200. Not counting the cost of the foundation which I built on concrete piers to raise it 12"-20" above ground level because of potential high water in the back of my property. The foundation would have cost more if I had that built. I also bought a nail gun, PC 350RH and a compressor, which I wanted anyway. So to me I have the enjoyment of building it, the knowledge I gained the extra tools, and will come out much better than what would have been built for much more money. My time has been well spent in the project plus the added company and friendship from a neighbor who has been helping. C Cole

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Where did you order the plans from? Which plan?

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One thing to remember about using T&G plywood for the flooring is that the T&G will take up about 1/2" from the width for each row. If you put down 3 rows of it, you will be 1 1/2 inch from the width of 12' which you would expect if you did not know. If you use T-11 siding which overlays on the edges, it comes out to being the correct width when you put it up. (T-11 siding is wider than 48" to make up the difference,) (T&G plywood is not as the tongue sets in a 1/2" when butted against the other sheet.) I found out the hard way and had to cut down the width of the shed by 1 1/2" to get the proper floor dimensions to work out without having to buy and cut another row of plywood to get the extra needed. You can't just add an inch and a half.. but would have to rip the sheets to give a proper width to get it nailed down. So make sure you measure the plywood you are going to use before you make your final layout for your base and walls to see that it is going to be what you think it is. C Cole

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I bought a shed a number of years ago for $1400. It's a 10'x12' aluminum skinned, 2x4 walls & rafters, t&g pt floors, 2x8 foundation, a couple of windows, pre-wired, and a 48" door. It's made by Robin's Sheds. Best one I've looked at. Comes with a 20 year warranty. It's half way there now and still in excellent shape. Completely waterproof and has survived a hurricane (cat 1) and several tropical storms here in FL. I'd be hard pressed to make one for significantly less at the same quality. I figure my time is worth something too.
The best advice I can give about a shed is calculate what size you want, then add at least another 50%!!! By the time I get my riding mower, generator, bikes, and camping equipment in there, that sucker is full. No, I didn't have all that crap when I bought it... which is why I suggest buying/building a bigger shed than you currently need. :-)
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On 21 Aug 2003 04:23:04 -0700, john_20_28 snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (jm) wrote:

But how much is the experience of doing the whole project yourself worth to you?
I waited until I was 46 to overhaul my first engine (100k+ miles later and still chugs along just fine) and 58 to do my first construction (the shed) and I wouldn't trade the experiences gained for anything. I knew only a little of house construction but there were lots of books available on the subject that helped me out. I drew the plans up on AutoCad to be very similar to the one it replaced that termites dined upon. I followed house construction guidelines for the most part, most of the best materials I could find, was careful, and it is one heck of a lot better built than the house it sits behind. Sure it took a couple of months off & on of planning, problem solving & building and I didn't feel too good when my son's friend came by & told me he & his dad built theirs (twice as big as the one I built) in a couple of weekends but I am very happy with the results.<G> You can find some plans & shed building books at the borg and check your library as well. You can also try taking measurements off a shed you see that you like if you know the homeowners. Keep in mind it is only a shed. You can make mistakes there that are not all that costly to straighten out and don't forget, you will get a tremendous amount of advice from your neighbors...some of it good.<G> It is a project that, when you are done, you will step back and say "Gee. I wish I had done that a little differently. Hmm. Maybe on the next one....." You can't find that in a kit.
Kiyu
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