Can I "rout" with a drill press?

Greetings, I'd like to investigate using my drill press to cut sideways. Google hasn't been much help, but I gather that real router bits and drill presses don't mix. Ok, won't go there.
In previous projects I've cut groove waste with a series of Forstner holes, but that leaves dimples from the guide point. (Cheap Forstners. Very cheap.) I've also used my circ saw to whittle out the bulk of long grooves, then cleaned up with chisels.
In my most recent project, I had to do two 22 inch long 3/8 inch wide grooves (among others). A snaggle-toothed beaver would have done a neater job. I did the shorter grooves with a dozuki--neat as a pin.
So, I look over at the drill press. (I'm a Reformed Neander.) If not router bits, maybe one of those drill-bit-like saw blades that go in (I think) some kind of wall-saw?
--
"Keep your ass behind you."

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All I can say is that a router is so fantastically superior and easier for what you are trying to do, that I couldn't recommend any other approach. Once you've had the opportunity to do some of those grooves with a router, you'll throw rocks at any other ideas. Not only is it faster, but the finished result is outstanding.
Bob

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Caveat: I 'm responding to A. in my post even though heirarchically it looks like I'm responding to Bob. For some reason A's question doesn't come up (using web Google NG).
Sounds like your problem in part is a conflict between wanting to econommize on the one hand and wanting to be in touch with your inner Neander on the other.
To accomplish both, if the DP worked fine for you except the dimple, why not file off the guide point (you said they were cheap anyway)?
Have you tried hand planes that cut grooves and dados? Usually these are more expensive than good used routers, but they keep you Neandering.
If you get a router, just spend $20 or so on a 1.5 hp on ebay. Or go for Ryobi's 2hp plunge for under $100. Or HF's 3 hp plunge for $80 on sale. These will get you started.
Thoughts for your consideration, H

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snipped-for-privacy@sewanee.edu (Hylourgos) wrote:

Today I made a plow plane that uses a 3/8 chisel for the iron. Works like a charm. Tomorrow I'll look at making the outrigger fence. Inner Neander is happy, inner cheapskate is happy. I used the DP to drill the dowel holes to register the resawn face.
--
"Keep your ass behind you."

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I think that if you do this very much you will likely damage your drill press. The quill and bearings weren't designed for that lateral load that this will be creating (a machinist that I work with warned me about this).
Even a cheap router will do a vastly superior job.
Tim

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It's a chuck attachment problem, not a bearing issue unless you try milling steel or something.
GTO(John)

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Bad idea -- drill press bearings aren't built to withstand sideways forces. What you need is a milling machine (or a router).
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I've used my drill press with a router bit, but to take off very small amounts of material and not for extended periods. You could grind the point off a Forstner bit and use that. I also use the drill press for sanding (there's a spindle sander in my future). You can potentially damage a drill press (quill) if too much sideways force is applied. Like others said, get yourself a router.
On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 00:20:24 -0600, Australopithecus scobis

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Every time I've tried that, the chuck has fallen out. MT2 tapers aren't designed for sideways forces, and most drill presses won't have a drawbar.
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I have an Atlas (circa 1940's) that came complete with a shaper fence, bits HSS and an attachment to lock in the morse taper. The manual said to take shallow cuts and be patient. So maybe not designed for it but they can do it. Your tool, you do what you want.

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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

I have chucked in a router bit into my old Craftsman DP to do some touch up or take care of a whoopsie when the router was nicely set up for some other facet of the job. I run the DP at top speed (8550 rpm) and take shallow cuts to minimize quill problems. Had it for 30 years and no runout problems.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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It's not the bits so much as the bearings.
The quill bearings in a drill press are not designed to carry side loads. They are designed to carry axial loads (i.e. pushing down). Sure, it'll work for a while, but you'll be damaging the bearings, and it probably won't be a very accurate cut either.
Lathes, milling machines, and routers all have bearings designed to take side loads.
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This is mostly a myth. True, you don't want to do lots of heavy milling on a DP, but the bearings in most ones made since the '50s (excluding sleeve-bearing models like the home Rockwells) are _identical_ to those used in motors, compressors, even actual routers.
Just standard sealed ball-bearing races like you find in everything else. They can take any radial load reasonable in the tools I named above. But ues, for have milling you need sturdier types like tapered roller bearings.
The biggest issue with routing or shaping with DPs is the Jacobs taper in the check, and to a lesser degree the Morse taper on DPs that use removable arbors. These tend to fly off under radial loads. A secondary problem is that if you _really_ cranked sideways on a DP you could bend the spindle. But it's not very likey unless you have an ultra-flimsy DP or put abusive loads on it.
GTO(John)

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You can't tell by looking at them. Internal construction varies quite a bit.

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What are you talking about? You run the spec numbers on the bearings. I'm saying that the bearings in most of the DPs I've overhauled used stock off-the-shelf bearings. Name numbers and maker as used in zillions of other things.
GTO(John)
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You can, however a "Australopithecus scobis" would have a hard time spinning the DP by hand fast enough! Dave

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