CAD for simple 3-D metal & wood projects?

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On 11/25/2013 9:24 AM, jim wrote:

Huh? I guess you didn't check out my offerings?
http://www.home.earthlink.net/~cavelamb/draft.htm
Lofted to .01 inch, since traditional nail in the floor lofting considered 1/8th inch superb fairing.
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Richard wrote:

I did look. And its nice work. But you aren't claiming that you took a 3d model and produced a part held to tenth accuracy. If you can achieve .01" accuracy in manufacturing that hull to match the 3d model, that would be extraordinary accuracy.
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On 11/25/2013 10:18 AM, jim wrote:

I'm sorry, Jim, but this sounds like arguing just for the sake of arguing.
Drafting (or modeling) and machining are two distinctly different disciplines and outside of a few hobbyist, damned few people do both.
A fiberglass boat's hull is seldom held to anywhere near that accuracy. If you check carefully you will usually find all manner of inaccuracy in construction. Missed dimensions (by INCHES some times), asymmetry, misalignment, etc, that the eye simply does not catch.
On the other hand, large steel ships MUST hold that kind of accuracy. Those ships are built in smaller sections called "lifts", which are then stacked together to form the finished structure. They HAVE to be built that accurately just to fit together.
For what it's worth...
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You hit it right on the head. That's why it's not suitable as CAD, even though it's an extremely useful system for visual presentation.
And although I might not have made it clear... that was my whole point on base-1.
Lloyd
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On 11/25/2013 9:34 AM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Except that what you quoted as justification for your "whole point" is incorrect, therefore you're still wrong.
With SketchUp, "precise numerical inputs" can be input to the same precision as AutoCAD, by simply using the keyboard.
Try again ...
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On 11/25/2013 9:34 AM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Lloyd, you simply do not know how to use Sketchup to its extents. Your comments show your ignorance about Sketchup. I'm not trying to belittle you but most every thing you have mentioned about Sketchup is inaccurate.
Again, I switched from AutoCAD to Sketchup about 6~8 years ago because I get the same needed resolution and accuracy.
I am a woodworker and routinely work with pieces that measure in 1/8" resolution however the program is quite capable of accurately and quite quickly drawing a box that is 4 1/16 x 5 3/64 x 9 19/32.
don't knock the program until you actually learn how to use it, not just play around with it.
I would be more than willing to show you some detailed drawing that I have done with Sketchup.
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On 11/25/2013 11:00 AM, Leon wrote:

Ayup ...One would hope that their accuracy in their work indeed exceeds their accuracy/misconceptions about a program with which they obviously have little familiarity. ;)
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If I were using it for woodworking, I assume those accuracies would be adequate, if a little gross for a CNC router...
But I work daily with sub-thousandth measurements. Do you really understand how funny dealing with "thirty-secondths" sounds to a metalworker? Today, I had to lay out a complex, multi-curved cam slot a half-thousanth wider than a bearing, because the bearings that ride in it work the plus side of their tolerances -- and the bearings are spec'd by the customer. Even two thousanths of an inch would cause them to track wrong.
I also am not belittling what you do. I've done it (in a prior life) with very nice results on some 'fine' reproduction furniture. They're just not the same games, that's all.
I have -eh- maybe 250-300 hours building large-scale models in Sketchup; 100 meter scale. Maybe I could finesse it into doing 1/4" stuff to tenths of a thou.; but why, when there are CAMs out there well-adapted to what machinists do? Why use an axe where a scalpel is called for?
Lloyd
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On 11/25/2013 11:49 AM, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Not in the slightest for a CNC. Why would one choose odd ball tolerances, tiny fractions, when working with wood? Sketch up is being used for CNC machines and 3D printers.
Metal working in some cases would be another matter.

And given the OP's original post to this thread do you realize how funny it sounds to use a program that uses the resolutions that you are speaking about when Sketchup is more than capable of satisfying his needs for free?
I realize you work with high resolutions, that is the requirement of metal working. But Sketchup is far more of a program than to simply sketch out pencil type drawings.

And Sketchup would be more than fine for reproduction furniture drawings.

So with that kind of time put in with Sketchup you are just getting started. I have many more drawings than you have in hours and most of the drawings require 10~20 hours of design.
If you need that higher resolution use the program that works but your descriptions of the capabilities of Sketchup makes one wonder if you really know what it can do.
I think the biggest problem with this whole thread is that the OP posted to wood working and metal working. His first item on his wish list was for wood boards and followed by stuff you make at home. He had the knowledge of 2D CAD programs so he was not totally ignorant of what to use but IMHO he wanted to do 3D for, most likely, less than extreme resolution drawings.
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On 11/25/2013 12:34 PM, Leon wrote:

My bet is that the OP would be much more than perfectly happy with this for his simple "3-D metal" drawings:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-nUVUXF4Ods0/UpOS_ypsf_I/AAAAAAAAUys/V6amC_suz40/s1440/Untitled.jpg
:)
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On 11/25/2013 12:56 PM, Swingman wrote:

And for the most part a majority in this thread! LOL. There are a few that may not be and rightfully so but just because I drive a Maserati does not mean I use it to it's limits. The Camry works just fine and in many practical ways out performs the Maserati.
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On 11/25/2013 1:17 PM, Leon wrote:

LOL ... just ragging on you a bit, Bubba. ;)
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On 11/25/2013 1:20 PM, Swingman wrote:

I know! LOL Idle hands. Too friggen cold in the shop.
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Far be it for me to criticize you Leon (you do good work) but I just can not visualize you in a Camry. ;)
But your point is well taken.
Reminds me of a job I did years ago. I was working with corporate publications and was hired to figure out the best way to send out publications to a select group that needed updates on a semiregular basis. I checked out several types of binding and distribution. My conclusion? 3 ring binders! I got them in contact with a source to make them up some binders and dividers.. And it was a success. They just copied the material on 3 hole sheets and sent it out. Simple. And better than any other alternative. Simple trumps complicated crap every time. Particularly if it gets the job done quick and easily.
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On 11/25/2013 4:09 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

LOL, Then picture me on a Maserati. ;~) Actually a 2012 Camry SE V6 and 07 Tundra.

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On 11/25/2013 4:24 PM, Leon wrote:

Leon, you need to come check in at ToyotaNation(dot)com forums. All the cool kids hang out there.
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On Mon, 25 Nov 2013 17:09:48 -0500, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

True indeed. On the other hand..simple isnt always "simple"
Build a grade 8 ball bearing.
Its simple.
Then do a grade 9
It too is simple...
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    I have noticed, over the years, that the simplest instructions are usually the most difficult or time consumptive. Make grade 8 ball bearings. Build a wing in 3D space in CATIA. Put a canal across the Isthmus of Panama. Send men to the moon and bring them back in the next decade. Change the timing belt. -- pyotr filipivich "With Age comes Wisdom. Although more often, Age travels alone."
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I thought $600 to change a timing belt was robbery until I did the job myself. jsw
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No thanks, I had friends with MGs and Jags and learned my lesson to avoid them. My Honda Civic cornered tighter than my buddy's MG Midget, though he was the better and crazier racer.
A local dealer had a Lotus in his showroom. I sat in it, opened the glovebox door for a flat place to put my coffee, and watched it sag down under the weight of the cup. jsw
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