Cabinet Saw Purchase

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I'm in the market for the purchase of a cabinet saw. Last summer I burned up a ryobi direct drive milling cypress for a deck. I promised myself, never again direct drive. I have a chance at a used Delta cabinet saw, 3h, 3 belt, 220v with Beismeyer Fence. Includes rollers and extended table wings. $1200 In that new ones are around 1500, my thinking is I am not getting that much of a break. Anybody out there have any opinions on this or advice on cabinet saws in general.
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On Thu, 8 Apr 2004 08:14:42 -0500, "Kirk E. Dobihal"

Most everyone will leap to the conclusion that a Delta cabinet saw you're refering to is a Unisaw. And it may be. Delta, however, does (did) make a "Tilting Arbor" saw that is really a contractors saw in a cabinet. Keeter refers to it as Unisaw Light. It's not worth $1200, even new. Make sure this isn't one of them.
- - LRod
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LRod writes:

Note the 3 belt. The Unisaw Lite uses, IIRC, 2 belts.
Charlie Self "Adam and Eve had many advantages but the principal one was that they escaped teething." Mark Twain
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"Charlie Self" wrote in message

this
That's what I was thinking also, and was why I leapt. IIRC, the "Unisaw Lite" was selling new for around $1299 ... but with all the Delta models/flavors these days, I could well be mistaken.
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On 08 Apr 2004 15:00:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I wasn't aware of that. I just wanted to throw the U-L out as something to watch out for. There have been plenty of people that weren't aware of its existance.
Thanks.
- - LRod
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On 08 Apr 2004 15:00:47 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

The General 350/650 uses 2 belts.
Barry
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"B a r r y" wrote in message

Cheap POS, eh?
... you know I'm kidding. General is the only saw I've seen in that general price range I'd consider trading my Uni for.
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Yah'but, I don't trust anyone's description of a machine unless I'm there when he/she's describing it.
I can't tell you the number of times...
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LRod wrote:

I'm sure someone will prove me wrong but I don't ever remember referring to it as a Unisaw Light. I have though referred to it as a WantsaBeAUnisaw or/and a Contractor'sSawInnaBox.
There is a saw that has been referred to by me as the Baby Unisaw or the Junior Unisaw but the WBAU/CSIAB isn't that saw.

Ditto what ElRod said. Also, the WBAU/CSIAB isn't even worth $600.
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wrote:

Hmmm. I stand corrected. Maybe *I* just coined it...
- - LRod
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Is this the "Lite" version: http://www.deltawoodworking.com/index.asp?e 6&pH35 ? And: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
It's almost $1200 from Amazon. (The Unifence version, 36-731, is $1250) Delta's website does not call it a Unisaw.
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wrote:

Kind of looks like it. I haven't looked at one in years, ever since I found out what it really was. I can't believe they have it priced that high.
- - LRod
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It's not a contractor saw in a cabinet. Check the specs- it's a 3 hp 220/ only motor. It simply isn't called a Unisaw and I'm not sure why - probably because it's made in Taiwan to compete with the lower end cabinets in the marketplace.
Don

1/ref%3Dsr%5F11%5F1/102-7387547-6100946
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wrote:

That doesn't make it not a contractor saw. Now I don't know this for a fact, but when the discussion has come up before it was described as having trunnions that hang from the top (ala contractor saw) as opposed to the trunnions attached to the base and the table bolted onto the trunnions. That's the genesis of my "contractor saw in a cabinet" apellation.
They can put any motor they want on a contractors saw. Granted, it might be a little less useful to those contractors using them in the field without easy access to 220, but that's not its defining characteristic.

Because it isn't a Unisaw. It's not like a Unisaw except for those three diamonds on it and the big handles. Even the fence is different (although you can get it with a UniFence, as previously noted by another poster).
- - LRod
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LRod writes:

Actually, most contractors don't want to deal with contractor's saws on a day to day basis. Home in the garage, sure, but not on a job site. Job site saws are what you and I call benchtop saws, for the most part. They weigh about 60 pounds or less, and I've heard carpenters bitch about them being too heavy, so imagine how they feel about the new Ridgid TS3650, which spits on 300 pounds. And most of the better job site saws now offer a wheeled stand that makes them even easier to transport from job to job.

Actually, it is a lot like a Unisaw, except made in China or Taiwan. Fences do not define Unisaws. The first Unisaw I owned had a Jet Lock fence. Ask Keith about that one. Quickly removed in favor of an Excalibur, in my case.
And I do not believe you'll ever see a contractor's saw with 3 belts. The hybrids go for the contractor's market share, with semi-enclosed bases, so I can no longer say a contractor's saw has its motor hanging out the seat of its pants, but most really do.
The trunnions attached to the table instead of the cabinet are only one feature. Being a b*llbuster to adust compared to a Unisaw, or any other cabinet saw, is another feature of contractor's saws.
Charlie Self "A democracy is nothing more than mob rule, where fifty-one percent of the people may take away the rights of the other forty-nine." Thomas Jefferson
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On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 17:56:03 +0100, LRod

FWIW, it's NOT a contractor saw in a box. It's closer to a Unisaw than a contractor saw. It's got a 3HP motor, and enclosed base w/ dust collection, and two belts vs. the Uni's three and a contractor's saw's one..
It's hard to tell if this saw has trunion adjustments of a Uni, or contractor style. I'll bet that it's got the fit and finish of a Grizz. I'd love to see one in person, but no local dealers have one.
Me thinks this is aimed at other imports like the Jet and Grizzly. It gives a dealer ammo if the customer says "I can get a cabinet saw for $1200, or a Jet for $1500 with a router and lift."
Barry
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B a r r y wrote:

Under the top the design is the same as found on the Unisaw. The major departure is in the motor mount. For the Chiwanisaw Delta did away with the proprietary motor mount and uses a mount that takes standard frame (footed) motor. They are also selling the saw with a removable arbor, something you'll only see on the larger 12/14 saw. I'm curious as to the what/where/why of this feature. With the 12/14 it was done to allow for different arbors to be used. It's seems like a pricy feature but then I suppose the children of S.E. Asia maybe aren't charging Delta too much for it. It's also might be a selling point. And then it might also be a feature to allow the sale of the saw in Europe with a shorter arbor. It's a wonderment for sure.
Other parts may be different enough to not make them interchangeable with the Unisaw but I wouldn't rule out a very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very close match.
Unisaw: http://media.ptg-online.com/media/dm/PartsLists/20040114094051_CS4K151.pdf
Chiwanisaw: http://media.ptg-online.com/media/dm/PartsLists/20031030092857_CS4Q6B.pdf
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wrote:

sounds like a good feature for a guy who likes to tinker with machines.

although I can't think of any immediate application for this feature, I do like machinery that is easily adapted and modified.

and ifchaiwanese build quality continues to climb while USA build quality continues to decline this could wind up being a desireable piece of machinery, somewhere down the road. considering the asian attitudes towards propietary design, these features will likely be adopted throughout the tablesaw making industry there and soon show up in the grizzly and yorkcraft and woodtek models as well.
think we'll start seeing some lines of chaiwanese woodworking machinery being marketed under their own names soon? it has happened to some extent with the metalworking tool market- you can buy rongfu mills and such now with the rongfu name on them as well as with more western names.

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Bridger:

With the 12/14 saw the arbors came in 1" and 1 1/14" diameters as well as longer arbors that would take a 2" wide dado. There were others but I don't have the paper in front of me.
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mttt wrote:

No. That saw is the Chiwanese cabinet saw that Delta started to import into Kanada a couple of years back. Word was that with the exchange rate your average Kanadian was faced with buying a Unisaw or paying out a couple hunnert dollars more for the General. It was a no brainer. Delta stepped in with this machine to try and win back market share.
Anyway, to make a long story short, they (Delta) have begun to market the Chiwanisaw in the US.
The Contractor'sSawInnaBox/WanstaBeAUnisaw is this one.
http://www.tegstools.com/details.php?prodID 612
This saw was dropped from the Delta line around the turn of the century. It's now been dusted off and has re-debuted in Kanada. It's only a matter of time before it re-finds it's way into the lower 48.
And with the closing of the Tupelo plant it's only a matter of time before the Unisaw gets dumped for the Chiwanisaw.
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