Cabinet Doors

Mostly a lurker here but desperately need your help on these doors. These are nothing fancy floating panel doors to go on a painted storage cabinet. When I dry fit the frames everything is flat and square on the workbench and everything lines up. The panels when laid on the bench are flat also. When I slide the panels into the frames for the final dry fit, one corner or opposing corners will slightly bow. Have checked all rails and stiles for squareness of cuts, groove for correct depth and that the panel grooves line up. What am I missing? Any thoughts and assistance will be greatly appreciated.
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 Have checked

Check that the style/rail grooves are cut straight, all along their run, no slight curves WITHIN those channels. Also, check that the panel edges are cut straight all along their run.
The channel ends may line up, but there may be a "bend" (curved cut, somehow) in a center area, somewhere. Same with the style/rail channels.... the ends may align, but an edge may have a curved cut (somehow), somewhere. The boards may be flat... it may be a cut that is not straight.
Flip the panel over, right-left & up-down, install each application. Does the problem still exist in each application?
Sonny
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On 5/12/2011 11:12 AM, Sonny wrote:

but had not thought about the grooves not being cut perfectly straight. Will check that first I think.
Roger
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Sonny likely identified the issue. If a straight edge laid up against the groove shows some bow, you can just rabbit the back side of the panel(s) a bit to add clearance and overcome the binding. Then use some space balls or some other method like foam rubber or tubing, etc added in the bottom of the grooves to keep the panels from rattling.
Sounds like you are doing some cool stuff and doing it right ie Dry Fitting. Not everyone is alwasy so smart and ends up witha glued up problem. Of course that has "never" happened to me. ;^)

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Not ever having created a raised panel door or any rail and style doors, yet, I would have thought the panels should fit very loosely and then after fitting and maintaining flat a rubberized (usually silicone clear) caulking would be applied, inside to stop rattling and assure expansion adaption. I have seen too many that rattle like heck after ten years of hanging in a dry heated home.
Is this too tacky for better quality cabinets? I know this may not help the rail and styles already machined out. ---------------
"SonomaProducts.com" wrote in message wrote: Mostly a lurker here but desperately need your help on these doors. These are nothing fancy floating panel doors to go on a painted storage cabinet. When I dry fit the frames everything is flat and square on the workbench and everything lines up. The panels when laid on the bench are flat also. When I slide the panels into the frames for the final dry fit, one corner or opposing corners will slightly bow. Have checked all rails and stiles for squareness of cuts, groove for correct depth and that the panel grooves line up. What am I missing? Any thoughts and assistance will be greatly appreciated.
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On 5/12/2011 1:13 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Thanks to you and Sonny. You both nailed it. Really close inspection revealed about a 2 inch long groove section that was not perfectly straight. Recut the groove on that section and then it was time for a few cold ones to restore my sanity. Thanks again!!
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