Cabinet Door Question

I want to build solid slab cabinet doors with 1x birch or maple.
The widest door will be about 18" and 41" long.
Can this be done with glued up pieces of 1x? Is it stable enough or will it expand and crack? Is there another hardwood which is more stable and more suitable for such a project?
TIA,
JR
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This is pretty big for slab doors but it can be done. Rip your pieces to 1.24 - 2" wide max and invert every other rip so that the end grain creates a "wave" pattern. I would consider gluing the panels up out of wood that is at least 1.125" thick. Let the panels stabilize for a week or so after glue up. Then you can plane (or sand) them down to final thickness. The extra "meat" will allow you to flatten the doors without going under your 1" target thickness. Any panels that have warped beyond this tolerance should be rejected. DD
"It's easy when you know how..." Johnny Shines
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Yes it can be done and you will have no problems if you follow standard frame and panel door making procedures
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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Mike G wrote:

I don't think he wants frame and panel - just flat slab door.
Since he stated doorS some questions
What wood - expansion & contraction may or may not be a big factor depending on the wood
Doors ovelayed or inset? If inset wood movement could be a problem for the fit.
Doors closure against each other or with stile (or is it rail) between them?
Whatever you do, get a finish ON BOTH SIDES of the slabs as soon after glue up as possible. DO NOT WAIT A WEEK OR SO before getting some finish on it (DAMHIKT)
Consider at least bread boarding the ends and maybe a sliding dovetail "cleat" in the middle of the inside.
charlie b
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That's certainly a possibility and, if that is the case, you covered it nicely.
Take care
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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JR:
Slab doors work fine as overlay doors or rabbeted edge doors but will expand and contract too much for use in most inset door applications.
I wouldn't use a glued up slab without battens on the back of the panels. The best way to fix the battens is to have the battens and the slab form a sliding dovetail connection. You can pin one end with your fastener of choice and a spot of glue but the rest must be left unfastened, or fixed with screws in slotted holes, so that the slab can expand and contract.
A less labor intensive method is to use battens applied to the back of the slab with screws in slots wide enough to allow for the movement of the wood.
You will need a minimum of two battens, set a couple of inches in from the top and bottom. On doors over about thirty six inches in height, I would put in a third batten on the centerline.
It is critical to use the same finishing schedule on both sides of the panel and particular attention should be paid to coating the endgrain.
In most instances it is better from a time and stability point of view to use cabinet grade plywood with solid edgebanding, rather than solid stock.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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Thanks to all who responded. They are overlay doors and I now have a lot more confidence in doing them.
I had visions of the longer doors checking after a year or so. I could live with that but not with the wailing that would emenate from the female half of the household.
;-)
-JR
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Those kind of doors are subject to twist, cup, and strange warping, although smaller cabinet doors may be okay. Best bet is using stiles, rails and floating panels for a tight-fitting door. What you propose will be a heavy and you'll need to give some thought about beefy hinges. No reason 18" wide wood will crack, nor any guarantees. A lighter wood such as white pine or yellow popular may be better.
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wrote:

What?
You should use narrow pieces glued up for a door. Reverse the grain on every piece. Loose panels in frames are better. Get a good book.
--
Jim in NC



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