cabinet door ideas


Looking for alternatives to raised panel doors and got to thinking. If I would use just a plain (but cherry) ply slab could find a design to overlay or otherwise enhance the simple slab, that might be one way to go.
Some kind of neat handles is another alternative.
That said, anyone have any ideas or urls to share that would give me some ideas.
(Yes, I'm going to do my own google search, but ya never know what additiona gems you guys'll come up with).
Thanx Renata
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The cabinet guys were using molding on birch plywood slabs about 30 years ago. This was the basic cabinets and damn few folks could afford raised panel doors.
This will also require the purchase of some fairly expensive molding unless you are looking at paint grade cabinets.
It will also require a "great deal" of patience and skill in cutting molding.
Fancy hardware has saved many a sorry looking set of cabinets.
Renata wrote:

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Renata (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| Looking for alternatives to raised panel doors and got to thinking. | If I would use just a plain (but cherry) ply slab could find a | design to overlay or otherwise enhance the simple slab, that might | be one way to go. | | Some kind of neat handles is another alternative. | | That said, anyone have any ideas or urls to share that would give me | some ideas.
Renata...
I was playing around with routing decorations into composite sheets for cabinet doors a while back. I didn't come up with anything I really liked; but one of the ideas may trigger a better idea from you. I'll post my sketches to ABPW.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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wrote:

You might check with your local lumber yard and see if they have something called cabinet door lip mold or D-158. It's a molding made to frame around plywood doors and leaves a 3/8 off-set for use with a 3/8 off-set hinge. Very common 25 years ago but less so now. Our local yard still carries it in oak but cherry might be hard to find. Also any millwork that has been around that long will probably still have knives and might get a kick out making it for you. If you have a router and some bits you can probably come up with something of your own design that would serve the same purpose.
Mike O.
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Now that's a good memory. I couldn't remember the molding name/number to save my life. My first kitchen was birch plywood and finished out with door lip molding.(1974)
Mike O. wrote:

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I was actually thinking along this line (door lip), briefly. I'm really looking for some cool ideas for a design or sumptin' I can incorporate into a slab door. Or a treatment for said slab to make it interesting. e.g. a thinner wood overlay on part of the door that is a design or creates a design when combined. Or, anything else.
I know there's sites out thee that are like galleries of people's work. Perhaps if y'all know of some (yes, I've saved some of the ones that have come up here in the past).
Contemporary theme, since that's my style and the appliances are SS and I think they are better suited for contemporary than traditional.
THanx Renata

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wrote:

my inclination would be to just get some ply with reall nice grain. if you want to go over the top, maybe dress it up with a bit of molding.
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A cheapy way is to cut a 1/16" x 1/16" rabbet around the perimeter of the plywood slab and then glue hard wood rails and stiles around the perimeter. This adds a decorative small grooved detail between the hard wood and the panel and also hides the joint.
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I've mixed and matched doors, some cabinets with straight maple with curved sides and some with aluminum and glass.

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wrote:

I moved my office upstairs this weekend (the old one became a dedicated lathe room) and was looking at the chessboard I had made several years ago. The frame around the board is black walnut with butternut accent inlays. To get the inlays in without a lot of carving, I had mitered the pieces of the frame, and then cut grooves in with the tablesaw (two rip cuts each). After getting the grooves in place, I resawed some thin strips of the butternut to the size of the grooves in the walnut, then ran a thin bead of glue down each groove, and tapped the butternut into place with a mallet. After it dried, I scraped the waste off with a cabinet scraper, and it left an absolutely seemless inlay that has been in place through all sorts of temperature and humidity changes.
I know the above was a little long-winded, but the technique might work nice for making borders on your doors. It's quick and easy to get a very nice result with. Depending on the look you're going for, you could just cut the grooves from edge to edge, and overlap them.

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