cabinet box material

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Common sense is indeed very uncommon.
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Best regards
Han
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Yeah, why can't they just mark them honestly?
This is a highway. This is a back road. This is a dirt road. This is a dirt-bike trail. This is a horse trail. This is a deer trail. This is a hiking path.
Simple.
-- Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of creative effort. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt
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There is a local fire department who have rescued a number of spanish speaking tourists from a lake. It seems that the GPS directs them, in spanish, to drive on a boat launching ramp into the lake. A classic case of listening to a voice come out of the dashboard, instead of looking out the front window. One factor is that these have all occurred at night. Srill... Needless to say, the local rental companies are not happy with this. All the cars were rentals.
Kinda like getting run over by a train. How do people do that? Or the ladies who did not know they were pregnant. There are a lot of clueless folks in the world.
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Time to learn about your GPS options. Garmin has an "avoid dirt roads" that actually works.
------------- "J. Clarke" wrote in message
Sometimes the route changes, some stuff may be put there for copyright- defense reasons with the expectation that nobody will actually be stupid enough to follow it.
My favorite was the time I was told to get off the Interstate and take a side road. Well, I did. It was OK pavement for about a mile, then turned into crappy pavement, then broken pavement, then good dirt, then crappy dirt, then a Jeep trail, and when it got to where I had to go through a hole cut in a chain-link fence I decided that maybe I should go back to the Interstate. How that got listed as a road I have no idea.
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*snip*

We had one take us 20 miles out of the way to get ice cream. It never got used for the rest of the trip. They're neat toys, and occasionally useful, but require so much oversight as to be pointless.
Btw, if you ever are getting off I69 to head West on I80, don't head east to the travel plaza that's just a mile away. You have to go all the way to Ohio to turn around.
We've had our adventures with maps as well...
Puckdropper
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wrote:

Which is what MDF is mostly made of. He did know that, right?
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Deadly plywood glue is MUCH higher up on the Bullshit-To-Make-A-Sale scale than deadly generic glue.
Lines like the guy told the OP give me headaches. You have to figure out if the guy believes it and is just misinformed, opening up the question of what else he's misinformed about, or just making up stuff to make a sale. Either way it's a red flag and I'd move on from the guy, especially since the OP said the guy had an attitude.
R
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On 8/18/2011 11:18 AM, RicodJour wrote:

    He may have convinced himself, but I'm really giving him the benefit of the doubt. He had just returned from a family funeral in Europe--unless he made that up too.
Steve
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"RicodJour" wrote in message
Which is what MDF is mostly made of. He did know that, right?
Deadly plywood glue is MUCH higher up on the Bullshit-To-Make-A-Sale scale than deadly generic glue.
=============== Formaldehyde is a dangerous substance that many MDF products release into household breathing space.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium-density_fibreboard
--
Eric



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On 8/12/2011 11:12 AM, Steven Bornfeld wrote:

You are correct to be concerned.
IME, for longevity, and particularly with Euro style cabinets, go with the hardwood PLYWOOD boxes option, without question.
My qualifications for this "voice of experience" opinion regarding kitchen cabinet construction:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/KitchensByEWoodShopInNewConstruction2002201102
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On 8/12/2011 12:38 PM, Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/KitchensByEWoodShopInNewConstruction2002201102
Pretty impressive--thanks!
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IMHO, cabinet grade plywood is superior to MDF or any of the other "compressed wood" products. I am a hobbyist woodworker but I have managed to pay for my workshop and tools strictly from income derived from building cabinets, bookcases, entertainment centers etc. for profit. Many people prefer the look of "European" style but to me it seems a bit "sterile" or plain. Much depends on the rest of the decor in the house and especially the kitchen. Having said that, the European style can be accomplished using plywood instead of MDF, MDO or other products. ...........................IMHO. By the way, screws aren't used as prevalently in cabinets as you might imagine.
Max
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On 8/12/2011 11:52 AM, Max wrote:

On a Euro slab door, I'm now a convert to MDF. In particular a Temple-Inland product called "UltraStock":
http://www.templeinland.com/BuildingProducts/MDF/ultrastock-mr.asp
The moisture resistance variety is a plus for DOORS and DRAWER Fronts in the kitchen environment; and the finishing for most Euro type finishes is much better, and much less expensive to effect, than plywood doors and drawer fronts.
Highly recommended!!
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As expected from Karl, excellent information from a PRO!!
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Han
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On 8/12/2011 12:59 PM, Swingman wrote:

    Well, it sounds like the domestic maker thinks this way. The boxes are plywood; the doors are MDF with maple veneer, multiple layers of finish. I figure there will still be some back-and-forth about the details. My wife is pushing for Blum hardware.     Thanks to all for the knowledgeable responses!
Steve
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Interesting! Thank you.
Max
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wrote:

I would go with the hardwood plywood . Nothing wrong with that if built with care and quality.
I would also offer another option that might give you better cabinets and save money (but it depends on where you live).
We live in SE Kansas just 30-40 minutes from the Oklahoma and Missouri state lines. There is no shortage of cheap hardwood, and very skilled cabinet makers in this region. We compared two local cabinet shops with Lowes, HD and an area Home Decor Store. We ended up going with one of the independent cabinet shops and couldn't possibly be happier. The shop owner's wife was the designer and coordinator. She measured everything, did simple CAD drawings to show us what we would get, and she checked in while the carpenters were building the house to make sure nothing changed. She had face-to-face contact with plumbers, electricians and myself to make sure things would fit. Quality is wonderful. Drawer and door fronts use Oak that is planed thicker and finish is beautiful. Top-notch hardware and assembly. The cabinet shop crew installed them themselves and did it expertly. They were 10%-15% below the competition because they had full control of the project from design to install; and they "shipped" them in their enclosed trailer. Our case is not an anomaly - our son built his home about 120 miles east of us, in the middle of the Ozark lumber region, and had a similar experience. Main difference is his cabinet shop hired an installer.
If you live in a region that might have the right kind of resources, look around.
RonB
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On 8/12/2011 12:58 PM, RonB wrote:

    I doubt very much that we do (I'm in Brooklyn NY), but your way sounds wonderful!
Steve
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I would go with the hardwood plywood . Nothing wrong with that if built with care and quality.
I would also offer another option that might give you better cabinets and save money (but it depends on where you live).
We live in SE Kansas just 30-40 minutes from the Oklahoma and Missouri state lines. There is no shortage of cheap hardwood, and very skilled cabinet makers in this region. We compared two local cabinet shops with Lowes, HD and an area Home Decor Store. We ended up going with one of the independent cabinet shops and couldn't possibly be happier. The shop owner's wife was the designer and coordinator. She measured everything, did simple CAD drawings to show us what we would get, and she checked in while the carpenters were building the house to make sure nothing changed. She had face-to-face contact with plumbers, electricians and myself to make sure things would fit. Quality is wonderful. Drawer and door fronts use Oak that is planed thicker and finish is beautiful. Top-notch hardware and assembly. The cabinet shop crew installed them themselves and did it expertly. They were 10%-15% below the competition because they had full control of the project from design to install; and they "shipped" them in their enclosed trailer. Our case is not an anomaly - our son built his home about 120 miles east of us, in the middle of the Ozark lumber region, and had a similar experience. Main difference is his cabinet shop hired an installer.
If you live in a region that might have the right kind of resources, look around.
RonB

Oh, shut up, Ron. You're just trying to make me feel bad about living in the desert. <G>
Max
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Steven Bornfeld wrote:

Horse hocky

Ply is much, much better. It is strong, it is unlikely to be ruined if there is a leaky pipe. It does screws just fine as long as the screws are into the face, not edges. Its one disadvantage (in addition to cost) to something like melamine covered particle board is that it has to be finished (coated).
With particle/fiber board, glue works much better for holding things together than do screws. Nothing wrong with glue for ply either.
Keep in mind that euro style cabinets are usually boxes without a face frame. That can give them a clean look but also makes them less strong; OTOH, cabinets don't *have* to be all that strong.
Personally, I prefer ply, face frames and solid overlay doors. Gives a pretty clean look and they last and last.
--

dadiOH
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