Buying USA?

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rate at a artificially low rate to keep the price of chinese good low, and the price of american good high. Unless this exchange rate is allowed to "float", the cash will continue to move to china. The exchange rate was a big part of Bush's recent trip to china.
And don't think that the average chinese worker is the big beneficiary, the government controls the economy and reaps the biggest rewards. How else could the chinese government afford to buy Conoco oil.
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hello,

this is only partially true, the RMB will go up compared with the $, but it's because the $ will be going down compared with the rest of the world curency. this means expensive gaz and imported goods. China is protecting the $ by keeping their $ stock unused (at great cost for them at the moment) but it will not last forever, and once they stop, it's going to be a bad news.

on a per product basis, it's the manufacturing business owner (often from taiwan) that make the most money.
The government redistributes a lot of that welth in other places (such as public project and construction) and to stabilize the economy (buying US bonds among other things).
regards, cyrille
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On Tue, 06 Dec 2005 16:01:24 GMT, evodawg

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz. Plop, Wrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.
Reel 'em in.
--
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evodawg said:

At the risk of repeating comments and opinion I have expressed since 1995, you can bet that a portion of the money pouring into mainland China IS being used for military buildup and engineering. And for the acquisition of financial power as well. Buying up stumbling American companies, with their names and reputations is de rigueur for most foreign investors.
And as recently as, oh... say... Bush's visit last month, they have openly declared that an autonomous Taiwan is currently being "tolerated" by the current PRC government - barring a complete make-over of the current government, it's only a matter of time before an attempt to "re-integrate" Taiwan is made.
The Chinese name for the region is Zhongguo, which roughly translates from Mandarin into "Center Country", and represents their view that China stands at the center of that society's known world, surrounded by menial tributary states.
Lest you perceive this as a slam against the Chinese people, it's not. They are no different than the population of any nation - they want to eat, be sheltered, and be free to live out their lives peacefully.
But China is a cesspool of pollution, oppression, and exploitation. People argue that China will ultimately buy products from the US, but it isn't likely. The government promotes internal policies that promote the development of competing technologies, even if, and especially for, for internal use. DVD formats, computer software are two examples. As their abilities and capabilities evolve, they will be producing their own cars, their own planes and their own military weapons. Besides, what the hell do we make anymore? The only thing China wants from the US is money - as much as possible. When they do buy technology, it is to reverse engineer and copy. They are the Apprentice who steals your tools and your customers. China does not want to participate in a world economy, they want to build an empire. "Patience, grasshopper. We've been around 8000 years, and can wait a few more..." Fraught by centuries of vacillating Warlord and Imperialist rule, civil war and oppression, China isn't likely to turn over a new leaf so easily. Those that truly believe we aren't holding a tiger by the tail are fools, and those that deny it are avaricious liars - IMHO.
There are those that argue that, in the long run, it doesn't matter what the origin of a product: "Products are imported and sold, with the majority of the profit being retained in the U.S." The _rest_ of the sentence should include " - by the moneychangers." The oft decried many-headed hydra of banking and money hoarders.
A pair of jeans manufactured in the USA cost $12.00 in 1995. They were constructed of US made fabric and YKK zippers from Macon, Ga. In 1998, the cost was $12.95 and they were imported from China. The fabric, the zippers, and the seamster's labor. What's the difference, you ask? The US goods are still going strong, and the newer Chinese replacements have already fallen apart. This scenario is realized every single day of my life. It is false economy. But...
The big-box retailer is now paying $3.20 per pair, instead of $6.85. Did they give their employees pay raises or heath care coverage with the added income? Hardly...
Do you honestly believe that monolithic corporations, now or ever, pay their employees more, or treat them better, simply because they are making more money on imported products? Hardly - in fact, quite the opposite case can be made. As demonstrated by the incompetence demonstrated by the employee involved in the Wal-Mart/GAF debacle.
Wait, I can hear you now: "He was an exception, an aberration. Most managers are polite, competent, and interested in good public relations." If you think this is true, I'd _really_ like to know what universe you're living in.
Maybe if that mgr made more than $22,000 a year for a 10 hour a day, 6 day week job, he might adjust his attitude. Instead of constantly thinking about some other pipe-dream job where he actually makes enough money to feed and cloth the kids, pay taxes, pay for home heat and the obligatory automobile - with it's additional rising costs of fuel and insurance, tags, taxes, and maintenance - he might actually concentrate on job performance. Those jobs are whipping posts (with apologies to the Allman Brothers). Restaurants, retail, hotel management - hmm... all jobs in the Service Industry - our big hope for the economic future. Sure there are exceptions, those primarily being exemplified by businesses that cater to the rich, but in general, Service Economy jobs suck - plain and simple.

Generally, if it walks like a duck, and quacks like a duck...

Probably, and additionally, they mark the country of origin in their catalog. That is one reason I shop there. I want to make my own choices as to what products I purchase and where they originate.
For me, it's not as much a question of whether a product is imported or not as it is one that begs to differentiate between whether a product was produced by a civilized country that occupies a responsible place at the table of world order. Does it provide it's citizens a just and prosperous life, and do they compete with other nations on a level playing field. China fails both of those criteria.

Uhh... it's been going on for at least a decade - you've just noticed?
ZZZZzzzzzzzz,,, click. Tick, tick, tick...
FWIW, JMHO, etc.
Greg G.
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They may buy products from the US, but I don't expect them to be big importers of finished gooods.
China is one of the companies that ignores patent laws. If they can make a cheaper product that is an exact copy of a US product they will do so.
The number 1 car in China is a copy of a GM car that is so accurate a clone, it has the same bugs.
The labor is going overseas. Our technology is going overseas as well. Our colleges are filled with students from other countries who take our technology and use it in their countries.
US is turning into a country that provides services, and raw materials, and not primarily a country exporting finished goods.
And most of the services we provide are available elsewhere for a cheaper price.
We still have strength in the entertainment business, but companies like Sony are trying to increase share there as well. Sony is not doing well. The WSJ was talking about the CEO being ousted because their last big hit movie was "Hitch," while they have mega-blockbusters that flopped. And now this scandal with the Sony Virus on the music CD's.
But the edge the US has in the global market is not that great. College graduates are having a hard time finding jobs. I'm concerned for the future of the US youth.
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Greg G. wrote:

Wow, that was a hell of an economics lesson. You must be a teacher. No I have noticed for years but within the last couple of years noticed you can't find anything made in the USA anymore.
My mom is an Interior Decorator and she insists on buying American made furniture for her clients. She buys most of this stock in North and South Carolina and told me last night on the phone she can't find any suppliers anymore that use only USA manufactures. She talked to one of the Furniture Organizations to try to get a list of only made in USA Suppliers and Manufactures but was told none is available. She won't take that as an answer and is still doing her best to find one.
Wondering what's next?
Rich
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but you can't make them THINK"
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The Hitchcock Furniture Company announced today that they are for sale. Same location in CT for 180 years. If she buys it, she will have control over what is made and can keep it in the USA.
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Edwin Pawlowski said:

For anyone interested: --------- HITCHCOCK CHAIR COMPANY COURTS BUYERS
NEW HARTFORD, Conn. - October 2005 -- Hitchcock Chair Company, a 180-year-old Connecticut manufacturer of distinctive hand-crafted hardwood furniture collections, has announced plans to sell its venerable brand and wholesale business.
This action is a direct result of the recent decision to pursue retirement on the part of Robin Faccenda, the current owner, said Ron Coleman, Hitchcock President since 1996.
We are considering offers from manufacturers in the industry and local Connecticut businesses who will embrace Hitchcocks place in New England history, and continue its legendary craftsmanship, quality standards and distinctive brand heritage, added Coleman. ---------
http://mfg.furniturefan.com/default.aspx?MfrIDa&location=pressreleases
If I were wealthy and wanted to live in Connecticut, I'd buy it. ;-) I remain hopeful that someone worthy buys the business and the name.
Greg G.
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Greg G. wrote:

Wow, that was a hell of an economics lesson. You must be a teacher. No I have noticed for years but within the last couple of years noticed you can't find anything made in the USA anymore.
My mom is an Interior Decorator and she insists on buying American made furniture for her clients. She buys most of this stock in North and South Carolina and told me last night on the phone she can't find any suppliers anymore that use only USA manufactures. She talked to one of the Furniture Organizations to try to get a list of only made in USA Suppliers and Manufactures but was told none is available. She won't take that as an answer and is still doing her best to find one.
Wondering what's next?
Rich
--
"you can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
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I think it's time to put some trade barriers back in place. We're being sold out by the 'free trade' advocates who claim that 'capital just wants to be free.' My answer to that is 'yeah, well, Americans want to have jobs too.'
When we signed free trade agreements (NAFTA was a good one,) there was a flood of jobs and money to other countries where things are cheaper. Fewer jobs here and less capital to invest domestically on modernizing our production to keep us competitive puts us in a downward spiral to the bottom. The free traders promise us that we'll reach an equilibrium point soon and then we'll be happy with cheap goods and the poor exploited workers will be happy with the $20 a week they get paid.
The problem is that no one knows where that equilibrium point is, but it doesn't take much common sense to see that there are billions of people in the world making $100 a year, which means we have a LONG way to go down as Americans if we blindly follow this path.
I remember reading a while back that every dollar spent on domestic goods produces something like $7 of economic activity in the US. I saw a free trader recently bragging that we get $1.14 in economic activity for every $1 spent on outsourced activities in other countries. That's a hell of a pay cut for the US economy.
My advice is to buy American when you can - ultimately it helps protect your job. I doubt if we'll ever get places like WalMart to carry USA made goods, but it sure would help if we could pressure the US government into preferring USA made goods - that would be a huge boost to our economy.
Dave
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There are some small furniture makers still operating in North Carolina, most seem to be located around Hickory, NC. Almost without exception the larger, more well-known brands are merely marketing, warehousing and distributing entities. Like with textiles, there just isn't much manufacturing going on. Job losses have been devasting to many local economies - Caldwell, Catawba and Rutherford Counties in NC in particular.
Appalachian State University actually still has a furniture manufacturing program but the graduates are having to become more specialized in the business side of furniture than in the actual manufacturing side. Some of the furniture faculty probably could provide some contacts; if interested contact me and I'll try to get you in touch.
evodawg wrote:

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Steve Hopper wrote:

I would appreciate that she has tried the Website buyusa.com but then again there are no lists. If you could get some contacts I would happily pass them onto my mom. Just email me at rent_my snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net
Thanks, Rich
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One old line chair manufacturer (going back at least to the '40s) is still doing business with U.S. made chairs. Sam Moore's of Bedford, VA, is no longer a family owned company (the owner put off his retirement at least a decade looking for a "small" businessman or woman to take over, but finally had to sell to a large entity, LaZBoy), but it still makes its top quality chairs in the same factory it has been in for years...though the factory is now much larger and more modern.
In line with the former owner's concepts of business, the company found its niche and filled it exceptionally well. It has been corporate owned for a few years now, but so far, the corporate SEEMS to have been wise enough to let it do what it has done for decades.
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It's amazing what peoples can accomplish with Asian knowhow and cheap American labor.     humbug,     jo4hn
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