buying advice wanted: countersink, shank, and pilot hole units

What's the best/fastest way to do this all in one shot?
I'll be using mostly #7 x 1-1/4, #7 x 1-5/8 square drive drywall screws, and #8 x various length drywall screws. I may also use some #6 screws.
I looked at the DeWalt taper bit and Lee Valley ones.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page2309&category=1,180,42240&ccurrency=2&SID Are taper bits they way to go?
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On Mon, 03 Jan 2005 22:32:05 -0700, nospam snipped-for-privacy@mesanetworks.net wrote:

taper drill bits are wasted with drywall screws. just use a drill bit the size of the root diameter of the screw, set just a bit longer than the tip of the screw for length.
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Just keep in mind that if you're using drywall screws you are NOT really cinching up your joint. Wood screws have a smooth shoulder on the shank so all the bit is in the piece being attached "to" and the piece being attached is chinched down. If you have threads the whole length you aren't pulling the pieces together.
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He would be if he used the bit he asked about. The greater diameter shank hole would allow draw.
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You right, I read too fast...just like I eat.
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yeah, i understand that the dia. of the hole in the "shank" piece needs to be a tad larger than the screw, and that the dia. of the hole in the "pilot" pieces needs to be smaller than the screw. Using drywall screws is probably not the smartest, maybe I should look at other woodscrews w/ real shanks, but it always comes down to having the "shank" hole all the way through the outer piece, and that is going to vary based on the size of that piece. But drilling 1) pilot 2) shank, and 3) countersink is very time consuming even with 3 drills!!
Just looking for "a better way".
wrote:

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On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 14:56:40 -0700, nospam snipped-for-privacy@mesanetworks.net wrote:

modern cabinet assembly screws are what you want.
they have a head kinda like a drywall screw. they have a rolled knife edge thread like a drywall screw, but the thread doesn't go all of the way up to the head. the root diameter is the same for the full length, though, so you only need one drill bit with the countersink on it.
try mcfeely's. http://www.mcfeelys.com /
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looking..
wow.. flat head screws? they have hundreds of "fasteners"
is black oxide OK?
On Tue, 04 Jan 2005 23:19:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote:

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On Wed, 05 Jan 2005 10:29:06 -0700, nospam snipped-for-privacy@mesanetworks.net wrote:

OK for what?
for assembling interior woodwork they're fine. for assembling an outdoor deck they're not.
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right, right I'm talking interior furniture, shop projects, etc.
On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 15:22:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote:

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On Fri, 07 Jan 2005 15:25:58 -0700, nospam snipped-for-privacy@mesanetworks.net wrote:

black oxide is fine.
for a screw with a head a little bigger than a big finish nail try trim head. they're good for installing mdf molding where a nailgun doesn't have enough grab.
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Drywall screw break too easily. They are a poor choice for woodwork.
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One word, Insty-Bit. OK, two words with a hyphen.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?SID=&ccurrency=2&pageH336&category=1,180,42240
This allows the poor man (non-trust funded wooddorker) to get by with one battery powered drill.
UA100
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the problem i see w/ this is the shank and pilot hole are the same dia.
either the pilot will be too larger or the shank too small
the shank hole needs to be through the outer board and slightly larger than the screw, while the pilot needs to be in the innner board and smaller than the screw
grrrr..
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coloradotrout wrote:

True.
And maybe it's not a problem.

Ahhhh, but I don't use "traditional" wood screws.

bow-wow...
UA100
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I have owned many countersink units. What a mess. Most work, sort of. The taper drill bits are nice but fragile and expensive. Carbon steel countersinks are worthless. High speed steel much better but still a pain if you drive a lot of screws. WE finally bought a set of Amana carbide countersinks. They are available separately. The have two beefy carbide wings, use a standard drill bit, have nicely machined bodies that match up perfectly with the plug cutters (to make buttons) and last a long time. I think they are around $20 but worth much more. max

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