Buying a Jointer

What should i look for in buying a jointer? Looking to upgrade from my 30" er.
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I am not sure you can upgrade from a 30"er!
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Before I make any comments It would be nice to know the following: "Looking to upgrade from my 30" What to you mean by 30 inches? Is this the length of the bed? The other question what do you intend to do with your new jointer. Do you have access to 220 volts and how will you dispose of the wood chips?

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Oops sorry....6" x 30-35" bed. Ok for 220v in shop, dust collector system hooked up to the one I have. Guess I'm just after a longer bed to be able to do longer boards and while buying that thought there may be other thing i should be looking for. thanks

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The type of jointer is function of what you are doing. As for me I use a jointer to line hardwood and softwood boards before ripping and then gluing. If the boards are badly crooked, bowed, cupped or twisted I use the jointer to correct the flatness of the board before ripping and thickness planning. I make an effort to glue no wider than 6 inches. Therefore a 6 inches jointer with a decent length of bed to make dinning table suits me fine. As for collecting the wood chips I made a little cyclone that fills a plastic garbage can. Here are the specs of my jointer made in China:
Features Motor: 1 HP, 110/220 volt (wired 110V) ball bearing motor Precision ground, cast iron tables, bed size 7" ox 45 3/4" Inclined dovetail ways with precision gib adjustment Both tables adjustable (rear table designed for rabbet cuts) Cutter head has 3 H.S.S knives and 5000 RPM approx. Max. cut - 1/2" Precision ground cast iron fence (centre mounted) positive stops at 45 degree and 90 degree Steel stand with enclosed chip chute gives 32" working height Gross weight: 108 kg.
I have two 6" jointers. My first one is made out of aluminums and I find it too light for long pieces of hardwood. I appreciate the weight of my new one and it well suited to line off 6 to 7 feet long boards.

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When you buy your new jointer I would suggest that you purchase an extra set of knifes and a settling jig. I only pay $19.00 CAD for a set of HSS knife made in China. I am fortunate to have a guy that cater to lumber mills and he does all my sharpening. For a set of three knifes he charges me $12.00 CAD. The sharpening machine he uses is computer assist. The diamond wheels are set for HSS or Carbide.

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You should be thinking of whether you want or need. As your fellow Canadian has said in his response, boards over 6" are usually ripped to escape cupping. As I say, boards over 70" are seldom used, which is why a 35" bed is more than enough, and more comfortable in a small shop. You can join longer, of course, and it's really not the jointer that will get in the way of a good join, but the operator, who will have to control the flopping board. If you're moving up from an aluminum benchtop screamer to an iron induction machine, you can expect to get batter performance and repeatability in the same width class.
Up at the college we had a 16 with a six or seven foot bed on it. Seems you can have the "best" and do poorly, because some Nimrod was always just slapping a board on the table without sighting and pressing without paying attention to tipping if the piece was twisted.
Why the policy is to account for wood in the rough, not the finish. Lots of thin stuff created at the jointer. Narrower than required too, as they chased the bow.... Never could figure why someone would join a six foot by six inch board on a 16" jointer when there was a six available.
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You may want to consider sticking with what you have. I have had a small 6" jointer for about 23 years and seldom use it. On more than one occasion I have considered getting rid of it and not having a jointer at all. Last year I straightened and flattened 200 BF of rough sawn 8' long Oak and none of it went near the jointer. I used a sled with my planer to flatten the boards on one side and an 8' sled on my TS to straighten one edge. More and mare you find available S2S-ripped straight one edge lumber that is ready to go straight to the TS or planer.
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Leon wrote:

Leon, Is your jig like this: http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2005/01/28/wb / Or a jig that rides along the TS fence and clamps to one side of the board?
Mike
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On Sun, 19 Nov 2006 23:19:37 GMT, "mcgyver"

As long of a bed as you can afford and have room for, and preference should be given to an eccentric adjusted parallegram design as opposed to a wedge bed design.
Frank
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