buying a dust collector

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Hi,
I'm in the market for a dust collection system for my garage/workshop. I have done some comparative shopping, and I have narrowed it down to either Delta or Jet. I'm leaning more towards Jet's, but I just don't know. If you have either of these brands, please reply back and let me know what you think about it. I just don't trust the reviews on Amazon!
Thanks
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Loves Wood wrote:

I have a Jet low-end DC, a Sears shop vac, a filter on a box fan, and a shop-built sanding table (based on a squirrel cage furnace fan). However, none of these captures the ultra-fine dust that is a long-term health hazard. I'm pinching pennies to put together a system to get rid of this very fine dust. Here is a starting point. http://cnets.net/~eclectic/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm
That said, my Jet DC gets the dust just fine from my 13.5" planer and 6" jointer. The shop vac gets most of the dust from my router table and contractor saw. (The contractor saw has most of the air gaps sealed.)
Because my mother developed lung problems in her 60's, I'm looking to capture the itsy-bitsy dust particles.
-- Mark
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I build the kits that are based on Bill Pentz's cyclone design. There are several reasons why I consider this to be the best unit available for overall performance. (details at
http://cnets.net/~eclectic/woodworking/cyclone/ClarkesKits.cfm
You would be well advised to avoid non-cyclone units that use bag "filters" because the fine dust that gets through is very dangerous. As for cyclones, there are cyclones and there are units called "cyclones" and since there is no standard industry definition for what constitutes a real cyclone, you're on your own there.
A few pointers when looking at cyclones. An efficient, effective cyclone doesn't need a large bag-over-a-barrel dust bin and bag after the blower. Yesterday, I got an email from one builder of the cyclone kit I produce. When he got his unit going, he put some fine MDF sawdust from his table saw into the inlet while observing the unfiltered outlet from the blower. The cyclone gobbled up the dust, but there was NO visible dust coming out of the blower.
A properly designed and configured cyclone is not a trivial matter, and when the design is not based on very sound physics and aerodynamics, it generally will not deliver top-notch performance. And don't forget, that many of the published "specifications" on dust collectors and cyclones do not represent anything remotely resembling actual operation in a real shop environment.
A well designed cyclone with proper filters and well-designed collection ducts does not leave dust all over your shop. If there's dust all over the shop, the collector isn't really collecting, is it?
Clarke
Mark Jerde wrote:

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On Tue, 23 Dec 2003 20:39:42 -0600, "Loves Wood"

The best ones are either Penn State or Grizzly. I've got the Penn State and I'm happy with it, but I'd have no problems with Grizzly either. Make sure you get a metal propeller. There's nothing special about Jet or Delta. I'd get the most power for the buck with 5 or less micron bags.
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There's also Woodsucker - a very competitive cyclone. For those who won't go the price or space of a cyclone, the Jet Canister system is very nice. Its head and shoulders above a bag style for effectiveness and ease of use.
Bob
wrote:

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The comparison between a metal fan and a fiberglass fan is that if you happen to suck up a nail, staple or other metal object, when it hits the fan it can throw sparks into your collected dust and smolder into a fire, long after you shut down the shop.
--

Re: buying a dust collector

Group: rec.woodworking Date: Wed, Dec 24, 2003, 3:15am (MST+7) From:
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Loves Wood said:

Funny you should mention that. I submitted several, and the negative review never showed up, the positive one did. Imagine that!
Greg G.
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Greg G. wrote in message

There are plenty of bad tool reviews on Amazon. Some of them even criticize Amazon.
Dick Durbin "Deck us all with Boston Charlie, Walla Walla, Wash and Kalamazoo...."
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Dick Durbin said:

Yes, I've seen disapproving reviews, but the disappearance of my own makes me wonder...
Greg G.
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Greg G. wrote in message

I've never had a review blocked on Amazon, positive or negative.
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Larry Bud said:

Maybe the bad ones take longer... <g>
Greg G.
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: Hi, : : I'm in the market for a dust collection system for my garage/workshop. I : have done some comparative shopping, and I have narrowed it down to either : Delta or Jet. I'm leaning more towards Jet's, but I just don't know. If : you have either of these brands, please reply back and let me know what you : think about it. I just don't trust the reviews on Amazon! : : Thanks : : I have the Jet DC-1100CK. It works great, gets all the chips and dust I throw at it from my planer and table saw. For the fine dust in the air I have the Jet AFS-1000B air filter. It too works very well.
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I've had a Penn State dust collector for about a month now. It really doesn't do as much as I expected. It is great on my router table, but does very little for the contractors saw, miter saw, or sanding. Had I realized this, I don't think I would have bought one; as a shop vac wasn't too bad on the router table either.
If anyone has advice on how to make it more effective, I am all ears (eyes, whatever...).
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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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thought but can't come up with anything that will be air tight, yet allow the saw to be adjusted. I was thinking about duct taping a heavy plastic tarp around the motor to allow it to move without leaking; yet allowing the cooling fan to work.
Thanks.
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Sure, give me a few days to get out there. It is simply a piece of 1/4" plywood across the back with a couple of cutouts for the belt and motor bracket. It does not come up to the top and it seems as though does not have to. The way I made it, the motor cannot tilt. Takes but 30 seconds to remove it though. Maybe someday I'll make it for the motor to tilt, but I rarely use it that way.
Under the saw is the Delta accessory. It is just a piece of molded plastic, rectangular, that angles down to the center dust port. You can easily make one if you have a different brand. I'd use 1/4" plywood and buy a 4" port or adapt one that is commercially available. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Your DC is designed to collect dust from a 2" or 4" port on your tools. The 2" port is for a shop vac because the tool either has a lot of the dust trapped (inside the wheel cage of a BS or under the table of a router table) and what little dust that gets away can be collected easily by the SV.
The larger machines that have the 4" collection ports are placed there as an after market product to match up with the existing standard of the 4" dust collection hose. Think! A 4" collection hose has a 12.56 Square inch area across any part of the hose or a 12.56 cubic inch per lineal inch of the hose. Now to fit this 4" hose into a square port, the smallest size would be 16 square inches or 16 cubic inches of box per lineal inch of dust port. This means you have lost 1/4 of your suction just by placing a 4" hose on the port.
A redesign of the port would effectively remove more dust by using the full power of the DC and not allow the dust ports to exceeded that of the hose which brings in the suction per lineal inch.
-- Woody
Check out my Web Page at:
http://community-1.webtv.net/WoodworkerJoe/WoodworkerJoesInfo
Where you will find:
******** How My Shop Works ******** 5-21-03
* * * Build a $20 DC Separator Can Lid. 1-14-03 * * * DC Relay Box Building Plans. 1-14-03 * * * The Bad Air Your Breath Everyday.1-14-03 * * * What is a Real Woodworker? 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Definitions. 2-8-03 * * * Murphy's Woodworking Laws. 4-6-03 * * * What is the true meaning of life? 1-14-03 * * * Woodworker Shop Signs. 2-8-03
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<SNIP>
What are you trying to accomplish by telling the poster to "Think!"? At best it seems condescending, bordering on rude. I believe that you could have effectively made you point, and spread some good will at the same time without the attitude.
Bob McBreen - Yarrow Point Washington
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My reason to say think is --- When purchasing a DC, it is designed as the standard 4" type system because the market shows tools with 4" ports. And then a dummy doesn't have to read "Connecting Woodworking Tools To A Dust Collector For Dummys"
My system starts out as a 4" system to the separator can. It leaves the separator can in a 3" line to a short manifold. There it branches to 2-1/2" lines where shop vac hoses connect the manifold to the tools with a 2-1/2" blast gate at the tools. Each of the after thought dust ports are redesigned to work on a 2-1/2" line. I have excellent pickup from everything from the router to the planer and even the TS after a well made dust collection port has been made.
So, think. If a shop vac will pick up the dust after it is made just as fast as it is made, then a shop vac or a DC with a shop vac hose will do the same.
When you go from a small lineal area to a larger one such as that is what happens in your separator can or cyclone, then the suction is decreased and the dust won't flow. The only thing size of the DC will do is overcome this change and make no need to read the above book for dummys.
However, when the dust port is redesigned so that the lineal area of the hose (ie. 3.1416 x 4 = 12.5664 for 4" hose; 3.1416 x 3 = 9.4248 for 3" hose; 3.1416 x 2-1/2 = 7.354 for 2-1/2" hose) is nearly the same as the port. This makes the port move suction like the hose and the chips and dust move in the hose and tool as they were one regardless.
However, it is easier to just buy a bigger DC to compensate for the change made from the hose to the port because most WW'ers don't have the ability to redesign the dust port, so they just hook up a powerful DC to after thought dust ports.
BTW, where were these dust ports on tools 30 or more years old, & why hasn't there been significant change in the DC collection on a TS where DC collection is needed most?
--
< snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net> wrote in message

<SNIP>
  Click to see the full signature.
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Joe,
How about having another run at that sentence wording? I read it five times and still don't understand what yous said. I have no idea what you mean by "move suction".
Bob

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