Burnishers

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On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 00:33:04 -0600, the infamous sam

Compared to a hardened screwdriver, no. Essentially, anything harder than the scraper alloy will be able to turn a hook.
I prefer a plain old honed edge to a hook, but I'm not using scrapers every day, either.
Use whatever you like. Try some things and figure it out for yourself, Sam.
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I've used a screwdriver shaft (go for one that isn't nickel-plated, from a good quality screwdriver), and tungsten carbide rods and rounds, and there isn't much reason to prefer one over the other.
A favorite old crosspoint screwdriver with a bunged-up tip can do this in retirement. Use that resource!
You want a hardened rod, so I'd think a valve stem or a shockabsorber shaft would be better than a pushrod.
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whit3rd wrote:

Yes, I think this would qualify as one of those times when you want a hardened rod. There are other times when having one is not particularly convenient...
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Steve Turner wrote:

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Steve Turner wrote:

I wouldn't know personally, but apparently it can be a real problem after four hours.
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Pushrods *are* hard steel -- harder than a scraper, anyway...
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I used to have a Lee Valley burnisher. I sold it right after I started using an old push rod. The push rod does a *much* better job.
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I went to a local engine-rebuilding shop and bought a few old push rods for a dollar apiece. Chucked one in the drill press and polished it with successively finer grits of sandpaper, ending at about 800 or 1000. I've been burnishing my scrapers with that for seven or eight years now. Works just fine, and beats heck out of spending $30.
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wrote:

Tough call... ??? 5$ for the rod and then 2 hrs to polish, I guess if those 2 hrs are worth less than $12.50 each...
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wrote:
[...snip...]

2 hours? I think that would be a 5 minute job...?
Now getting to the machine shop and back, depending on where you live, that might take some real time.
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Ten minutes from home... <g>
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Umm....no.... "A dollar apiece" for the rods, not $5 (where'd you get that from, anyway??), and maybe -- MAYBE -- fifteen minutes to polish.
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Some use the shank of a chisel.... That's what Tage Frid suggests in his books...
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As has been pointed out here, lots of things will work. In addition to screwdrivers and chisels, I have even used a large nail or spike.
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sam wrote:

Anything that is smooth, approximately round, and harder than the scraper will work. The burnisher is handy because it has a nice handle and a good length all of which is usable but there's nothing magic about it. I've used drill bits, chisels, and screwdrivers and they all work fine but they're harder to hold or have less working length than the purpose-made burnisher and with the chisels you have an additional sharp edge to avoid.
So, no, it does't make a better hook, but it's a more pleasant tool to handle for that particular purpose.
By the way, Amazon has "crown" brand burnishers, which work fine, for 15 bucks and shipping right now.
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I've been just using the scraper fresh off the file and it works excellently. Clamp the file in a vise, swipe the card a couple times, scrape away. Now this isn't for a finished surface, but for just smoothing out planer marks, glue, smal tear out, etc. prior to final sanding it works like a charm. Some guy over on lumberjocks.com has a blog on it if you want more detail.
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

I use card scrapers *all the time* and hardly ever piddle around with trying to get a hook on the edge. I usually rake mine across a 320 or 600 grit diamond stone to get a crisp, sharp 90-degree edge, and rarely am I ever left wanting for anything better.
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On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 22:23:43 -0600, the infamous Steve Turner

My method exactly, and I couldn't be happier. Hooks are for more patient people.
-- Follow the path of the unsafe, independent thinker. Expose your ideas to the dangers of controversy. Speak your mind and fear less the label of 'crackpot' than the stigma of conformity. And on issues that seem important to you, stand up and be counted at any cost. -- Thomas J. Watson
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If you have a lot of time on your hands, an old file does work well. Either round or triangular the trick is to grind it down to flat steel then polish it - progressively with something like silicon carbide sand paper - not easy given that it is hardened steel, but the results work well. I think this is an old British thing (at least it was an old Brit that told me about it) from back in the day when they would cut up old handsaw blades to use as scrappers.
HTH, Jeffo
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