Burnishers

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Not crazy about shelling out 30 bucks for a burnisher, but I'm wondering if a burnisher does a much better job getting the hook on a card scraper than the round end of a file.
Thanks,
s
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An old piston rod makes a nice burnisher.
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I think you mean a push rod... a piston rod would be a little unwieldy.
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wrote:

You're supposed to take it out of the engine?
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

burnisher back and forth, just slide your scaper back and forth across the pushrod.
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wrote:

Actually, some people burnish that way against a stationary burnisher. Might even be safer. :-)
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With all deference to Tage Frid, I never thought much of his advice to use a chisel for this purpose! Just what you want; applying a lot of pressure to a scraper edge with a chisel. If it should slip for some reason, you have potential for serious damage to your hand.
I have gone through a number of incarnations of scraper burnishers over the years, including the old Ulmia wheel burnishers, which still do an admirable job. In my toolbox, however, the weapon of choice is a homemade burnisher made from a triangular file. If you want to go this route, it is advisable to take the temper out of the file before grinding the old teeth away. Heat to cherry and let cool to room temperature, then grind away to heart's content. Put a slight radius on the edges. I have a rubberized abrasive wheel on the other wheel of my bench grinder which did a great job of working to a smooth mirror finish. Then harden by heating to cherry again and quenching in oil. Don't bother with tempering because, the harder, the better as far as burnishers are concerned. I doubt it'll be so brittle as to break unless you're opening paint cans with it... :-)...
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Regarding the applied pressure, I recall a discussion during which a metallurgist/woodworker said that excess pressure induced 'work hardening' that actually makes the job more difficult.
I suppose that finding the ideal pressure is a matter of trial and error (chiefly the latter of course), but I suspect that the diameter of the burnisher might affect the intensity of the pressure and guess that the polished back of say a 5/8in gouge might be about right.
Also, is a bit of lubrication a good idea or not?
Jeff, from his office chair.
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Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
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Jeff Gorman wrote:

IME, I would say yes ... in a pinch some old timers even recommend rubbing the burnisher on each side of your nose first.
<I can hear the jokes coming already> ;)
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"Swingman" wrote:

That's a trick my father used when assembling his fly rod to go fishing.
The oil in that part of your skin made taking the rod apart easier.
Lew
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On Thu, 03 Dec 2009 09:05:58 -0800, the infamous Jim Weisgram

Ayup. Done wrong, sharpening a scraper can slit your wrist DEEPLY!
-- Follow the path of the unsafe, independent thinker. Expose your ideas to the dangers of controversy. Speak your mind and fear less the label of 'crackpot' than the stigma of conformity. And on issues that seem important to you, stand up and be counted at any cost. -- Thomas J. Watson
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wrote:

I am thinkin you may mean push rod rather than connecting rod.
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You can use the shank of a screwdriver, but:
<http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p2643&cat=1,310,41070> $7.50 CAD
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

I heard high carbon steel drill bits work, too.
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-MIKE-

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Round shaft of a screwdriver works if it is smooth.
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says...

My question: will an actual burnisher do a much better job?
Thanks,
s
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I think the real issue is can you control the angle of the burnisher in a consistant manner, and put enough pressure to form the hook?
As I said, the Tage Frid book (Vol. 1) has a section on the scraper, and he uses the shank of a small chisel (AIR).
Clamp it in a vise, and bear down, maintaining the angle during the hook forming.
My trouble is, I am not sure if I am forming a 5 degree hook consistently. I can do it once, but if I come back months later, and want to touch it up, can I duplicate the same angle? Is it 5 degrees? 10?
You may wish to consiter the Veritas variable burnisher.
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pa448&cat=1,310
This lets you set the degree of a hook you want. That way you can have scrapers, with light, medium, and and heavy degrees of hoo - consistently.
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writes:

time I've ever been able to get a proper edge on my scraper. Maybe I'm a dumbass but no amount of effort resulted in the edge I was looking for.
I pulled this out of the packaging and about 5 minutes later I had the best edge on my scraper that it's ever had. I would highly recommend as I would just about everything they sell. Never purchased a bad product from them yet.
Larry
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sam wrote:

No. Assuming the alternative used is smooth.
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dadiOH
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says...

Thanks. Much appreciated.
s
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