Building workbench...how to level legs?

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Instead of sinking a nut into the wood, I was wondering if you considered trying T-nets to the same effect?
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*snip*

The problem with T-nuts is that they've got a tendency to come out if you're moving something quite often. Not a problem for the typical work bench, but for something like an N-trak module, it's definately something to be aware of.
Puckdropper
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Thinking about it, I'd also guess that any type of standard bolt and nut combination would cause the head to the bolt to gouge whatever type of floor that the bench is sitting on, especially so with a really heavy bench. Guess there's nothing to match a really level floor.
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What I've considered doing is putting the felt "feet" on the bolt head (just a little smaller than the head) to keep it from messing up the surfaces. I haven't tried it yet, but it'll be a lot better than bolt vs. floor surface.
If you aren't going to be moving the bench a lot (who does?) you could put the levelers on the TOP of the leg rather than the bottom and that would solve the floor problem.
Puckdropper
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wrote:

You could also round the edges of the bolt on a belt sander or grinder. Unless you've got a really spiffy floor on your shop, it probably doesn't need all that much babying.
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wrote:

I did, but they didn't have any T-nuts that size, and I thought it'd be interesting to make a hex-shaped mortise for a change anyhow. IIRC, to lay it out I ended up threading the nut partially on the bolt, then sliding in and just tracing around it. Only took a couple of minutes per leg- much easier and less fussy than tradtional M&T.
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Level? Forget level, I'm happy with "not rocking".
My bench is shimmed with squares of scrap cardboard. It never moves. I did actually make some attempt to get it level front-to-back, because I've got a bunch of drawers on ball-bearing slides, and if it's not level, the drawers open or close by themselves, which is annoying.
I've got a bunch of things which move around in the shop (bandsaw, drill press, router table, etc). For that, I've got a bunch of wooden wedges that live on the floor. When I move something and it's rocking on the uneven concrete floor, I just find the nearest wedge and kick it under the short leg. Seems to work well enough.
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Dooler wrote:

Put T-nuts and hex bolts into the bottom ends of the legs. Thread a nut on the bolt before installing it in the t-nut. Adjust the bench for level and use the extra nut on each bolt to lock everything in place.
Barry
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"Dooler" wrote in message

You can stop the bench from rocking on an uneven floor, but that doesn't necessarily mean that the bench is "level".
While the following doesn't necessarily apply to those Cadillac benches for aesthetic reasons, it will work on any bench destined for use on an uneven concrete floor like you find in garage shops, and it is cheap:
One trick that helps in solving both level and rocking problems, in that if makes it much easier to shim, is to design the legs so that half of the inside bottom of the leg (usually the inside half) is about 1/4 to 1/2" shorter than the outside half, thusly:
* * * * * * * * * ****** *******
That "notch" on the foot of each leg makes it real easy to shim heavy bench/work table for both level and rocking on all four legs. You can cut the shallow notch into your solid legs, or if you make your bench legs out of doubled 2 x 4's as many of us poor boys did, just make one tubufour slightly shorter than the other.
FWIW
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Dooler wrote:

I leveled my bench by using the old style (dense rubber) mousepads as shims. It also has the effect of preventing the bench from skidding on the concrete floor.
I can't imagine *trying* to cut the legs unevenly.
Wait a second ... maybe if you *did* try to, then your legs would be perfectly even. Heaven knows, doing it the other way didn't work.
Chuck Vance
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This really does not have to be complicated.
I have traditional maple bench that weighs in well over 200 lbs. The base has 3"x3" horizontal members near the floor.
I cut 3"x3" x 1/2" *pads* =for the whole thing to rest on. I tried it a recut the pads until everything sat just right.
One screw holds each pad to the bottom of the tressle cross member.
If/when I have to move and relevel the bench, I'll just make sone new pads.
-Steve

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Being lazy, and starting with a bench that I built for a level floor, I used the following method: (YMMV)
Drill 2 3/8" or larger holes in each "down hill" leg...
Mark matching holes in short pieces of scrap that matches leg.. (in my case, 2 x 6")
Rout adjustment slots in the pieces of scrap, usually 1 1/2" or so will do it...
Lift low end with floor jack until level...
Bolt scrap on legs with carriage bolts...
Lower bench and check level..
After adding these, I didn't like the look of the scrap blocks, (I put them on the outside of the leg, to avoid a cross beam), I added a 2 x 4" across the 2 scrap blocks for a foot rest...
mac
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Have you got a drill press? If so, set your depth adjustment and drill a hole half way through the center of a small piece of square scrap. Repeat four times (with identical thickness scrap). Level the bench with the lag bolts, then slip the scrap over each head so you don't gouge the floor. You could even bevel the edges so they'd slide a little.
JP
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