Building exterior door

I'm in the process of building an edge grain doug fir exterior door, 2" thick with double glass pane inside. door is built ( 80" x 40") and I'm constructing the door frame. what are the standard measurements for spaces between the top of the jam, sides of the jam and bottom? I can't find reference to that anywhere. I'm thinking 3/16" or so. Thanks
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If you have the old door, use its dimensions.
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Doug wrote:

I would suggest between 3/16 and 1/4 depending upon the size and type of the weather stripping.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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wot's an 'edge grain' door? Re gaps the old joinery manuals recommend the thickness of a penny for expansion (on an internal panel and frame door) which is more like 1/16th but then outside it would depend on the climate and the time of year and the type of wood and the dryness and the door construction and the finish and besides most doors these days have little rubber draught strips in them so not suprising you can't find a reference.
I wouldn't be pleased with anything greater than 1/8th.
And I have hung a few doors I wasn't particularly pleased with.
Tim w
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I just built a frame and door for my friend's new house, 96" x 44", 2.25" thick. I used 1/8" as a goal. The house settled a little between installing the frame and hanging the door so we had a time getting the gaps even.
BTW For a door that heavy (with glass, 200lbs), we used 5 ball bearing hinges. I left room to install 2 more if needed. I recommend BBHinges for heavy doors.
Jim

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I try to shoot for 1/8" on top and both sides. With a door this large a little more might not hurt. Be careful of the hinges because if the butts are swaged they will have a built in clearance which may or may not be enough to suit you. You can check this by closing the hinge to see if both sides lay flat against each other or if they just touch on the edge opposite the hinge pin. If they touch only at the end (swaged), open the hinge until both butts are parallel and you can see how much clearance is built into the hinge. If you need more, beveling the hinge side of the door (opening the hinge) will increase the clearance. Beveling the hinge side is always needed for an unswaged hinge. Since this is an outside door, the bottom clearance might be dependant on your threshold and sweep if your using either or both. Sounds like a fun project.
Mike O.
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Thanks Mike
wrote:

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