building bar rail molding


I've roughed in a bar in the basement, L shaped, about 6' on one side, 8' on the other with 45 degree corners at about 15" in length.
I really don't want to blow a ton on the molding, and would like something like this
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?pageW62
I'm sure I can cut the cove on the top, but how would I cut the straight angles that form to the plywood? One angle would be easy on the table saw, it's probably 15 or 20 degrees from vertical. But how do I cut the corresponding angle, as it would be 65 or 70 degrees from vertical? Obviously the table saw only goes to 45 degs.... I guess I would have to run the board through edgewise?
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Dado head tilted in the table saw? Either that, or I would make the piece out of square stock sufficiently large to allow it to sit flat on the saw (in the orientation as pictured) while I make those cuts at 90*. I would then cut the bottom off at the appropriate angle. Then do the profiling.
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We used a tilted dado set and made progressively deeper cuts as we moved toward the centre. And it was not by choice. There was a miscommunication (screw up) and the rail came in with the profile but no birds mouth. We like our angle better than the stock one as it sets better on the bar top than the stock one. However, it was more than a little nerve racking. Cheers, JG
gw wrote:

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wrote:

The link shows a modified form of Chicago Bar Rail.
When I've made this in the past I cut the bird's mouths while the stock was still squared up, using a canted setup of the dado head on the tablesaw.
I used a molder for the rest of the profile but the same could be accomplished by using the tablesaw to cut the cove and running the rounds with shaper or router cutters.
You will have to do a little fancy hand sanding to blend the cove into the rounds and I'd recommend buying stock long enough to do the whole run, including the returns, if that is possible - because it's easier to get a nice miter when the profiles come out of the same stick, and the grain blends together nicer.
HTH
Tom Watson - WoodDorker
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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