Building a shop

Page 1 of 2  
Hi,
I'm getting ready to convert a garage into a shop. It would involve insulating, wiring and sheetrocking the walls. I was just looking for advice on things not to forget to do before the sheetrock goes up.
Thanks,
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Along with all the other great suggestions. If you use pneumatic tools in more than one area hide a hard line with quick connects in various areas of your wall that way you use less hose and keep your shop cleaner. Puff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nick wrote:

Plenty of recepticals at about 48" high so they are easily reached when plugging in tools. Consider dropped recepticals for some of the tools also. One to the left of teh bandsaw prevents tripping over a wire and will not interfere with sawing.
Ligting over all tools, of course. How about an exhaust fan? Sure you can open the door, but a fan near where you do finishing will vent fumes and not all (but some) of the heat in the cooler months.
If you know the position of some heavy cabinets or shelves, consider a few horizontal nailers between the studs.
--
Ed
snipped-for-privacy@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski suggested...

Make 'em 49" or 50" high at the bottom. If you ever lean a sheet of plywood against a wall, you can still plug something in over it. Space them every four to six feet; you'll be glad you did.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Wilson writes:

Make that the bottom of the receptaclke at 50" so both outlets can be used. Another thought: I spaced my outlets 6' or so apart, some 4', and the ones I'm happiest with are the 4 way outlets on two sides of the center beam supports. Give some thought to using receptacles with 4 outlets on 2 circuits.
Most codes won't allow wooden walls in a shop that's in an attached garage. If that's the case, lay in some 2x4s or 2x6s between studs as nailers. Make them at 2-3 different heights, but use the same heights all the way around. You'll then know exactly where on your Sheetrock wall you can hang the heavy stuff without having to screw around with hollow wall anchors.
Charlie Self "Character is much easier kept than recovered." Thomas Paine
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 26 Jan 2004 00:29:03 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:
|Jim Wilson writes: | |>Edwin Pawlowski suggested... |>> Plenty of recepticals at about 48" high so they are easily reached when |>> plugging in tools |> |>Make 'em 49" or 50" high at the bottom. If you ever lean a sheet of |>plywood against a wall, you can still plug something in over it. Space |>them every four to six feet; you'll be glad you did. | |Make that the bottom of the receptaclke at 50" so both outlets can be used. |Another thought: I spaced my outlets 6' or so apart, some 4', and the ones I'm |happiest with are the 4 way outlets on two sides of the center beam supports. |Give some thought to using receptacles with 4 outlets on 2 circuits.
Yes. When I built my garage I put in an electrical panel with separate breakers for each wall, lights and door openers. I have outlets both at 50" above the floor and at 12". Since I'm in Tucson, I put in evaporative cooling, but no heating. Also 240V several places, including overhead drops. I also have a water line.
| |Most codes won't allow wooden walls in a shop that's in an attached garage.
Could be, I would have to check our local codes, but I suspect you are correct. My garage is still unfinished (open) studs except for the wall common to the living space which must be fire rated. I have 5/8" fire code sheetrock on the garage side and 3/4" on the living space side and a steel fire rated pedestrian door. If it is to remain a garage then fire is always an issue. Bringing a hot car or truck inside with 20 or 30 gallons of gasoline on board is always a worry. Even without the cars, a few gallons of paint thinner, etc. is always an issue.
If your roof joists will handle it, you might think about some hard points where you can add overhead storage later. My I-joists are still open and I just finished hanging a rack on some threaded rod for overhead lumber storage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25 Jan 2004 14:10:23 -0800, junkmail snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (Nick) wrote:

1/2" cdx plywood and white paint should cost about the same as sheet rock and mud and paint. also with plywood you can hang cabinets , tool holders ect... much easier without having to find studs. skeez
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
run phone and stereo wires
(Nick) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ditto that, Skeez. When I had my garage built, I finished the inside with 1/2 cdx plywood. Not much more work than sheetrock, and definitely worth it when it comes time to hang anything, esp cabinets. Actually, when you use ply, there's no need for mudding, taping, and sanding. And receptacles are just like horsepower, "Way too much is ALMOST enough". <G>                            Mark
snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I also did mine with 1/2 cdx, but used the tongue & groove type. That way the joints comeout perfect. Makes it even better than sheetrock.
Also definitely would put 3 or 4" DC pipe between the studs, and have 90's come out at the bottom to feed machines.
--Caleb

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
How about air lines, telephone, and cable for TV, if not for now, for the future? Along with dust collection. Maybe speaker wires for a sound system.
Just some ideas, it is much easier now, and it will look nicer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just got done with my place where i live(according to my wife)I call it a garage. After installing all the insulation and electrical i covered it with tile bored. It is the white shiney stuff(very bright) that is used in bath rooms. Never have to paint and very easy to clean. Cost about $10.00 A 4x8 sheet. If you figure it out it is cheaper then dry wall . No priming or painting. I also used dry wall screws for every thng. That way if you ever want to add or change something it is not a problem. Hope this helps Stan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do a scaled drawing with scaled equipment sizes. Plan wiring, phone, dust collection, heating, lighting etc from there. Don't forget wall space for tool racks/cabinets, clamps, material and jigs.
Good luck
Cheers,
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lots of good advice here. I might also suggest an electrical subpanel for your shop. Plenty of 220 service also. Insulate before you put up the wall board/ply. If you're in a climate with seasons, plan on a heat source.     mahalo,     jo4hn
Nick wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nick wrote:

In addition to everything else, consider soundproofing. Ask if you're interested and/or Google for past conversations.
4" studs on 6" plates will be a part of my next (first <g>) shop construction.
-- Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Plan a first-rate cyclone dust collection system. Stay away from the systems that use cloth bags. Invest some time and get educated at http://cnets.net/~eclectic/woodworking/cyclone/index.cfm
For a top-performing system get a cyclone kit and blower housing (http://cnets.net/~eclectic/woodworking/cyclone/ClarkesKits.cfm ) and add ductwork, impeller, motor, filter, and motor starter/controller and you have as good a system as can be found anywhere and all at a decent cost.
CE
Nick wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Think about air lines and DC piping while you have the walls down
You cannot have too many outlets, both 115 and 220
Also think about lighting the work area and how you will accomplish this.
Heating and cooling for those times when it is not a balmy 60-75 degrees outside
Think about a sink for cleanup.
John On 25 Jan 2004 14:10:23 -0800, junkmail snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (Nick) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Worried about hanging cabinets and such, just do the cleat thing. 1" x 4" 80" off the floor with another one parallel about 60" of the floor. Put a 45 deg angle on the high one, with a mating angle on the back of your cabinet. Then, you can hang the cabinet anywhere, even when you decide to move them.
(Nick) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 25 Jan 2004 14:10:23 -0800, junkmail snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (Nick) wrote:

Etch the floor and paint it (epoxy or porch paint) before the other work. It will keep the nastyass concrete dust out of your lungs (MAN, that stuff is nasty!) and a white floor is really nice for finding dropped items and for helping make the place well lit.
I like the shops which put up the drywall sideways and left an area in the center of the wall to run piping and wiring at the 4' height. It allows you to insulate well while the center maintenance area is accessible. Insulate everything.
Plan for lots of 120 and 240v outlets, good overhead fluor. lighting (perhaps on 2 separate circuits), separate incan. task lighting for the tools and work areas, etc.
I had a single outlet on each wall plus a quad drop in the center. I run an extension cord from the center to anywhere I need it if there isn't an outlet handy, but if I had bare walls, I'd run more outlets at waist or higher height. You'll probably want an electrician to run a subpanel for you, but check with them to see if they'll let you do most of the work (if you're comfy with that) letting them finish connections and signoff for a fee.
Paint the entire thing, from top to bottom, with pure white eggshell/satin paint. With everything white, I have a well lit 2-car shop using five 4' twin-bulb fluors.
---------------------------------------------------------------- * Blessed are those who can * Humorous T-shirts Online * laugh at themselves, for they * Comprehensive Website Dev. * shall never cease to be amused * http://www.diversify.com ----------------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
when I built mine I found a load of peg board on sale for $5 a 4x8 sheet. Didn't hang sheetrock, used the peg board.
--

http://users.adelphia.net/~kyhighland


"Nick" <junkmail snipped-for-privacy@mail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.