Building a shed????????

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TrailRat wrote:

I built my own 12x16 and am extremely pleased with the results. No regrets whatsoever. Since you obviously have lots of restrictions, I'd opt to have a Tuff Shed or some other prebuilt, then the powers to be see exactly what it looks like ahead of time w/ the companies brochures. You can do the finish work inside yourself, wiring etc. Oh, and set it atop rail road ties so its "portable". Mine is set on 3 rows along the 16' axis - sides are 2' in from the edge and 1 row along the center so the biggest span is 4'. But I also did the floor with 2x6s on 12" centers too. Grandpa John
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

It's a fair amount of work, depending on the type of roof and the size of the shed, but none of it is complicated. A circulr saw and a power drill (for screws) would be sufficient.

Probably not, but you'll wind up with a better shed. IMNSHO, if you do buy a shed, buy a wooden one, not a metal one. I've never seen a metal one that didn't leak.
Here in the states, some of the lumber yards and home stores sell wooden shed kits. Some pretty bad lumber in them, but still better than metal.

OK, again I'm speaking from whats available in the US. Put down a sand/gravel "slab" and level it. Put a plastic moisture barier on top of that. Then lay out the "foundation" from 4x4 treated timbers. Put exterior plywood on that for a floor. Paint both sides of the plywood with an exterior latex first. Proceed with normal wall/roof construction from there.

6' tall at the peak? Unless you're limited by law, I'd go 6.5' at the eaves and 8' at the peak. Of course I'm 6'2" - YMMV.
--
Homo sapiens is a goal, not a description

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I have twice built one of a pretty large size from plans I drew up myself, but I have a bit of experience in framing. At any rate you can do it.
You can save money but also very important is: it can be of a higher quality. If you can find a source of good used lumber you could save even more.
If you will be leaving it when you move you won't need to worry about moving it. But if you want to build it to be moved you could give some thought to how to build it so that it could be placed on a flatbed truck. A friend of mine built one out of used framing lumber and siding and had it loaded on a truck with a forklift and moved it to is new place.
At any rate best of luck. You'll have some fun and get a better shed to boot.
RonT
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You built the same shed twice? Maybe you should refine your plans to make it a little sturdier next time.
(Sorry, couldn't resist. :) )
- Owen -
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wrote:

That depends on who you are, and how quickly you can pick things up. Lots of guys can build a good shed the first time out, and lots of folks can't do it after twenty tries. Take it nice and slow, and make sure to measure constantly, and it should be pretty easy.

That depends on how much your time is worth, and how long it takes you to do it. In most cases, yes- but sometimes it's worth the extra price to buy pre-fab if you've got too many other irons in the fire. The other option is to find someone who puts them up in their spare time- I put up 3 or 4 sheds and/or garages every summer, and my going rate is $15 an hour. It takes about 20 hours for one guy to get the framing, roof and sheathing on for a decent sized one-car garage, and about 12 hours for a shed that is about the size you're describing. Depending on where you're located, that may be cheaper than buying one pre-made.

We've got some Amish in the area that really like building entire houses without foundations to avoid taxes. So yes, it's possible. Whether it's desirable or not is another question altogether, and one I'm not prepared to comment on.

What the heck do you need plans for? Buy a book on general framing (or get one from the library), and get to work. It's not like you're going to be laying out several rooms in something that small.

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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